Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My husband and I are tring to move a wall in our home. Is it true all exterior walls are loadbearing? If so what can we do if anything to move this wall saftly? The new wall will be 6 feet out from where the old wall is now. There will be perpendicular walls every 10 feet or so incolsoing the rooms. Is this all even clear as to what I am asking? :confused:
Dianne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,471 Posts
Like Tom said.
It can be done, I just did a bump out but what you are suggesting is an awful lot of work for only 6ft. You could add an addition for not much more.
I live in So FL (Miami-Dade Hurricane Code) and as an owner/contractor you can still get away with pencil drawings as long as they are signed off by a GC, architect or PE. You will also need permits and inspections with each phase of construction.
If you have a friend or friend of a friend who is a GC I suggest that you contact them to get the full magnitude of your project.
 
U

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Tom R said:
Call in a contractor. This is definitely not a DIY project.
Thank you for your quick reply. If you don't mind I would like to explain a little more of the design and situation to see what you think.
As it is now there are three rooms on one side of our home that are about 10x7 or so, on the outside common wall is a 6 foot wide roofed, floored walkway down the whole length. When we took out some inside sheetrock to see how things are we found that at some point the last 20 feet or so of this area must have been a garage since there is about a 12x2 header running down the length. My husband has some experience at remodling but not with load walls. What we hope to do is move the exterior wall to add 6 feet to each of the 3 rooms. We were hoping putting in a beam or something like that would work since there are cross walls each 10 feet.
We just had our 7th child and need the space! But don't have much $ What do you think?
 
U

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Thank you for your quick reply. If you don't mind I would like to explain a little more of the design and situation to see what you think.
As it is now there are three rooms on one side of our home that are about 10x7 or so, on the outside common wall is a 6 foot wide roofed, floored walkway down the whole length. When we took out some inside sheetrock to see how things are we found that at some point the last 20 feet or so of this area must have been a garage since there is about a 12x2 header running down the length. My husband has some experience at remodling but not with load walls. What we hope to do is move the exterior wall to add 6 feet to each of the 3 rooms. We were hoping putting in a beam or something like that would work since there are cross walls each 10 feet.
We just had our 7th child and need the space! But don't have much $ What do you think?
 

·
Custom Builder
Joined
·
4,406 Posts
I think your on the right track, your gona need a beam.

Multiply the length from the peak of the roof to the end of the eve by the length of the beam area unsupported then divide that by two. That gets you your SQ FT of load area have that handy when you talk to a contractor, he will know your local codes and may not even have to visit (but a visit would be best)

Good Luck

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,858 Posts
Sorry, but I'm just not getting 'enough' out of your post to get the picture. Maybe it's me, but I don't know which directions the rooms, the walls, the roof, or the beam go in. But either way, yes, a 'beam' can be put in a load-bearing wall. First of all, a load-bearing wall is one that is 'supported' all the way down to a 'footing'. This means all exterior walls (and former exterior walls) are load-bearing, and also interior walls that are located over the 'girder', located over the 'columns', located on 'footings'.

Some exterior walls are more load-bearing than others, Example - 'hip roof' walls are usually equally load-bearing, whereas on 'gable-roof' walls, the 'eave' walls are more load-bearing than the 'rake' walls. Either way they're all considered 'load-bearing', and are all treated the same (with great caution and respect).

So basically, your new beam will become 'bearing', and therefore it's end supports must transfer down to 'footings'.

With that in mind, the very 'basics' of installing the new beam, is to support the structure above while removing the 'said' wall.

The 'easiest' scenario is when the proposed beam will run perpendicular to the existing floor and ceiling joists, then you just build a 'temporary' wall about 18" inside the wall you're going to remove (to give you room to work). This wall should have a 'sole' plate, a 'top' plate, and 2 X 4's space a 'maximum' of 24" O.C., and should run the 'length' of the proposed beam.

If your floor and ceiling joists run 'parallel' to the proposed beam, that's a whole 'nother ballgame, but if that's the case, I'll be glad to help you further, just need more 'info', and, are you talking about an 'exposed' beam, or a 'flush' header?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,606 Posts
Just a quick legal reminder... ContractorTalk.com is not responsible for your house when it falls down.... LOL ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,471 Posts
I always fasttrack additions, meaning that all materials are on site prior to any demolition and that we work 12 hr. days until enclosure is complete. We follow the builders assocn 'Good Neighbor' policy and only work from 7-7, we also try to confine really noisy work from 8-5.
You can pre-construct footers, wall panels with plywood screwed to the trimmers where the windows and doors will go, roof trusses, disconnect elec., plumbing,etc so that they are ready for the 'barn raisin'. You can support the roof with screw jacks and 2X12's or 14's (scaffolding planks). Make sure that all of your inspectors have advanced notice, they really aren't bad guys.
D-Day. If your punch list is good (it never is) you will be closed up in a day (almost always for me). It's Monster House time! I do use chainsaws. Blow out the walls, install beam, prefabed walls, roof trusses and sheathing, inspection and dry-in, wing in some soffit and staple some VisQueen to the inside ceiling and you are enclosed in a day.
Almost nothing to it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,471 Posts
Nathan, I think that the advice to call in a contractor has us covered.
You were pretty quick with the disclaimer though! ROFLOL!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,858 Posts
I think we're all in agreement it's definitely 'contractor time'. If you have to ask questions about removing a bearing wall, you shouldn't be doing it. It's just too risky, and too many 'variables' for each particular job.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top