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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am not a mason by trade but i know if i were laying brick on the first row i would be either short or long on the last brick of the row. Just wondering if it is measured on the first course and all eye for the following courses? thanks
 

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Brickwork
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When setting out the first course you may have to adjust the size of the head joints to make it work without a cut.
The following courses will usually follow at either half or quarter bond. Generally this is done by eye, with some masons being better than others at keeping the head joints plumb.
On really high class work pencil marks are made on the bricks with the use of the level to keep them plumb, as on long runs the head joints tend to move about a bit.
 

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Vendor
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I re-read it and understand what you are asking now. You want to know how to deal with the closer (the brick to close the course). If it can't be made be at least a 1/4 module, then it is better to cut two brick to close the course, and hide the off-set head joints in the center of the run. If it works on 1/4 or half module, then place it at the end of the run. And, as stated, if it can be made up with the joints alone, just do that.
 

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Brickwork
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In theory the Architect designs the building to work brick sizes. In practice it never seems to work out.
When setting out for a house, it's best to drive the bond from the smallest runs so you finish up in the longest run where it's easier to adjust the joints. Normally I would reduce the size, as small joints usually look better than big joints.
We also try and work out where the window and door frames are going so the bond can be adjusted if possible to avoid a 3/4 cut at the reveals.
We have got the advantage with a traditional built house of being able to move the frames around to suit the bond. With the brick veneer ones that are sometimes being built now it's not possible.
 

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Chief outhouse engineer
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I usually mark the wall every 5 feet to help keep the head joints in line. Some guys say it's a crutch, maybe so. I would rather use a crutch than have the head joint move all over.

If you look at a brick job and it appears wavy or fuzzy when you stare at it, the head joints don't line up. I see it all the time and wonder how much Jack has been consumed when they were laying.

I agree with TS, the little slugs look like crap, cut several to avoid them. Cuts under a window or right in the corner are very difficult to see even to the trained eye.
 

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Plumbing up the head joints is a good idea and makes the brickwork look neater.
I don't know about your brickwork tolerances, but ours only allow for 15mm (5/8") in 2m(6ft 6 3/4") deviation in the head joints.
This is rarely inforced, but I have known the gable ends of new houses taken down and rebuilt when the buyers had a snagging survey done, and the joints were well over this.
I worked on a job in the centre of London were every second brick had it's head joint plumbed, but that is unusual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This is rarely inforced, but I have known the gable ends of new houses taken down and rebuilt when the buyers had a snagging survey done, and the joints were well over this.
[/quote]

Ouch:shutup: around here the brick goes past the soffit so they don't have to cut angles.
 

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We always lay out the first course dry, and adjust to make it work, even long long runs. Then to keep bond, I'm a big believer in marking plumblines every 5-6 ft. as dakzaag says....not a crutch...I don't care how good you are, without them your joints will swim, and that drives me NUTS! Obviously, you don't need to do this on short walls, but anything over maybe 16 feet I think is a good idea...
 

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Chief outhouse engineer
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I have yet to meet anyone who can physically do the work, let alone care to get it right. No big secrets in this ancient profession. Probably just my neck of the woods.:rolleyes:
 

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Is this just brick veneer over a flexible wood structure that has to fit what the wood-butcher put in or is an accurate real structure? In either case, the eye always controls the appearance and possible complaints.

Is the meat market in Pierz still as busy of when I dropped in every Friday afternoon for about 10 years when I wanted good meat (especially bacon) and service. Ppeming week-end of fishing they would have 12 (or more) people behind the counter. I always wondered where the 1,000,000#(advertised) of bacon went every year.
 

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menber
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I have yet to meet anyone who can physically do the work, let alone care to get it right. No big secrets in this ancient profession. Probably just my neck of the woods.:rolleyes:
yea u right thats what really pisses me off the most... although there are many secrets too this great trade :thumbsup:
 

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Just keep on a regular brick layout, and make sure that between bricks it is the brick length plus 3/8 of an inch.
 
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