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Anyone heard of a type of liability insurance that you can pull per job? I personally own $1k in coverage bc I'm out there everyday, but what about people doing sidework every now and then or a handyman type service? My nephew has been getting these small jobs here and there and wants to cover himself, but it doesn't make sense for him to spend a ton when he doesn't do it for a living. I told him its too much of a risk to not be covered and I'd see what i could find out. Any suggestions?
 

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Welcome to CT.

Some carriers offer "handyman" coverage which covers some things that a handyman might encounter (PROVIDED HE ISN'T DOING JOBS HE IS NOT LICENSED OR QUALIFIED TO DO)

Kind of iffy, but better than nothing.

You are right, he needs insurance.
 

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Zimmermann
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The first policy I had a few years ago I had the "option", but from what I understand it is really hard to find any agencies offering it anymore...probably after a ton of claims from people having been insured for 3 weeks or whatever decided it wasnt worth it.
 

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a friend who works construction 6 mos out of the year and performs another job the other 6 mos tried to get his policy amended so he would wouldn't have to pay so much since he only works 6 months out of the year.

the insurance company said NO.
 

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Anyone heard of a type of liability insurance that you can pull per job? I personally own $1k in coverage bc I'm out there everyday, but what about people doing sidework every now and then or a handyman type service? My nephew has been getting these small jobs here and there and wants to cover himself, but it doesn't make sense for him to spend a ton when he doesn't do it for a living. I told him its too much of a risk to not be covered and I'd see what i could find out. Any suggestions?
is this a typo? you mean 1000, 100,000 or 1,000,000?
 

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If he's under 18 and living at home I believe that there is a rider the parents can put on their home ins. to cover summer/part time jobs like this. Check with your carrier.
 

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I noticed that the original post was from 2 years ago.

It wasn't mentioned how old the nephew was. If he is a minor (between 14 and 17) and he is looking to do lawnwork and minor handyman jobs as casual after-school work; then that is a different situation than if he is in his 20s and looking to turn this into a full-time business.

As Sar-Con mentioned, coverage for casual part-time jobs such as babysitting and gardenwork can often be specifically covered under the parents' homeowners insurance policy by adding a rider.

Alternately, the homeowners of the places where the nephew will be working can provide the coverage. It is possible to include domestic labour such as maids, gardeners and maintenance workers as Additional Insureds on a homeowners policy as long as the work they do is strictly residential home maintenance type work at the insured home. If the neighbour's fence is damaged when the nephew is trimming the bushes, then that's covered. But if the homeowner also has him doing clean-up labour at his business' workshop, then that is not covered.

Workers Comp also needs to be considered. Generally, part-time yardwork and household chores while on the premises of a nonprofit, noncommercial organization is an exempted category. Of note, this exception usually prohibits the use of power-driven machinery. So, a homeowner who hires someone to operate a power lawn mower may actually be required to provide W/C cover. You would need to check the specific W/C requirements for your jurisdiction.

An alternative to W/C for covering domestic help, including minor handyman maintenance, is to add Employers Liability coverage to your home insurance policy.

Most people don't think twice about hiring the neighbour's boy to mow the lawn or run the snowblower without realizing that they could be held responsible if the boy is injured while using the HO's equipment. They equate the task with their own son or daughter doing the chore. The difference is when that young teenager gets injured, as a parent you are not going to sue yourself, but a neighbour parent will go after you if they feel you were negligent re their child getting injured while working for you.
 
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