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You would hire a LEED certified Subcontractor if:

  • They were Maximum 1% more expensive

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  • They were Maximum 3% more expensive

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  • They were Maximum 4% more expensive

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  • They were Maximum 5% more expensive

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  • They were over 5% more expensive

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  • Same price or cheaper only

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  • Depends on amount of LEED points

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a siding contractor, I am considering getting LEED AP certification in an attempt to set my company ahead of the rest. Currently our company is probably in the top 3 for siding companies in Vancouver BC for volume and quality.

Im wondering if, by getting LEED certified, will a General Contractor go with my company, being 2 to 5% higher, but offering a point value of LEED points.

Obviously this matters on a LEED project, but would it change the mind of a GC if it wasnt a LEED project?

Is there a market for LEED certified subcontractors
 

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You don't need an AP to get a project LEED certified. It's just a matter of registering the project with the USGBC and sending them some money. However, an AP can help streamline the process because there's a lot involved in attaining LEED certification, and you automatically get one point for having an AP involved in the process.
 

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The project is what is certified.
There is what is call a LEED certified inspector but the contractor doesn't have to be LEED certified.
On many projects there has to be a LEED accredited professional on staff to ensure the LEED practices are being carried out correctly they will usually work for the GC.
The LEED AP course is very difficult and most Architects will have a hard time with it
 

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The project is what is certified.
There is what is call a Leed certified inspector but the contractor doesn't have to be Leed certified.
On many projects there has to be a Leed accredited professional on staff to ensure the Leed practices are being carried out correctly they will usually work for the GC.
The Leed AP course is very difficult and most Architects will have a hard time with it
bconley is basicly right except that the course is not all that difficult. I know cuz I took it and have leed certification. It was an 8 hour course with a very boring instructer then an open book 25 question test followed by a 2 hour hands on training class. I took it as part of the weatherization conference in Indy last fall. I dont know what the class itself cost but the 4 day conference cost $600 bucks a person not counting hotel:eek:
No the contractor does not have to be leed certified to do a job envolving leed but a leed ap does have to be first on site and oversee the set up and then be there for the dismantle and finnal clean up. He must also show documention that he gave every body on site a crash course on leed safe practices although he cannot certify them.
 

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I think he's talking about LEAD. maybe the RRP rule.
thats right. sorrry. I guess I saw lead instead of leed in the o.p. It still makes sense even if you changed leed to lead in the first op. I even spelled it wrong in my post:oops:
I don't even know what leed means.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the responses!

I understand that the project is the part that is certified, but what Im wondering is basically why anyone would do a LEED project? Bragging rights? Do homeowners care that the bought a "LEED Certified" home? Can a builder charge more?

I dont build so it doesnt matter to me, but Im trying to find out if being a LEED AP as a siding contractor is going to get me more work, either as a value to the project or simply as a gimmick.

Does that make sense? Please give me your thoughts!
 

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That is because it is totally disorganized, not standardized, and usually bogus.
By definition LEED is "standardization".

There are two models vying to be the adopted standard.

The NAHB Green building standard and LEED.

They are both ways of measuring, what is bogus about that?
 

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As someone who does LEED paperwork daily, I can assure you that every single project has different paperwork to process, although the data required IS the same.
 
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