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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I normally would run flashing behind the ledger and then a second piece over the ledger as a drip edge. Siding/J channel conceals it all.

Trying to determine the best way to flash a ledger for this home. Using 2X8's set to the bottom edge of the 2x10 I will have the space to run the flashing up tight to the underside of the log above, but it would be visible. Do guys just use painted flashing or cut it a trim board/molding to conceal it. I'm trying to envision brown flashing here, but just don't like the thought of it.

Alternatively, I could flash behind the joist only and snug the ledger up close to the bottom of the log above. However there would be no drip edge over the ledger board.

Thoughts?
 

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Trees are Cool
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The flashing needs to integrate into the building envelope. If you can't do that then use spacers and hold the ledger off the side of the building and let the water pass behind.
 

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I'm assuming this is an actual log building. If that's the case, there are some long term considerations. If a log rots and has to be replaced, that's a HUGE deal. Always avoid the possibility of a log rotting. Having a rotten rim joist is easier to deal with.

Preferred way- bolt the ledger or double ledger into the concrete. This allows correct single or double flashing and use of a trim piece that matches the log profile.

If you attach your ledger to the rim joist, I think you're stuck using single flashing. I cut an angled piece to hold the flashing in place horizontally against the bottom of the bottom log, and caulk the flashing to the bottom of the log. The angled piece is angle nailed into the log and the rim joist. The ledger is installed tight to the bottom of the angled piece, and the flashing is bent down over it. I've only used copper flashing for this, and it weathers to a nice tone - no painting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Upon initial observation, it looked like a veneer to me, but I have never worked on a log home before. The owner was not there, but her son said if was for sure log construction. I did not enter the home since the she wasn't home.

I stopped by to measure during a downpour of rain and snapped a few pics and measured the area. She does want a free standing structure so ledger attachment is optional...I just wanted to know how to make it look good and protect that area.

One thing that I noticed is the side course of logs are stepped down from the back side of the house. Is that conventional design?
 

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If it's logs, everything above the rim joist should be solid logs, everything at and below the rim joist is to give a finished look and cover the rim joist / top of foundation - not solid logs. Standard way of doing it.
 

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As a side note, the logs usually have a custom profile, and the half-log parts match that profile. It varies by manufacturer, so having the pieces that were taken off the ledger and below can be pretty handy if they're still in good shape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If it's logs, everything above the rim joist should be solid logs, everything at and below the rim joist is to give a finished look and cover the rim joist / top of foundation - not solid logs. Standard way of doing it.
Gotcha. So basically it's veneer covering the rim and logs above. I don't believe the pieces that were removed are still around. So an alternative trim board is to be used, unless the builder (whom is unknown) can get replacements.

I wouldn't do anything to penetrate that rim, then. Free-standing, with attachment for stable stand-off into the concrete (or CMU?) wall below.
Wall is CMU. Rim attachment was primarily for lateral stability and to fill the void. Have you seen any L shaped prefab (or custom) standoffs that could run from the top of CMU and run up to the rim of the deck? I will put diagonal bracing in on the post. Running wood bracing to the CMU is an option, but may look funky. CMU has a scratch coat and will have stone veneer installed later on, along with a patio beneath the deck.


One way or the other, the exposed rim will need covered and protected from moisture. How would you handle it? Like I said, I'm used to tar paper/tyvec barriers already in place. My initial thoughts were to seal the wood, and install flashing up tight to the log and seal it, however I am very open to alternative solutions.


Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I hope that place looks nice from at least one angle.
Lady and her husband bought it in foreclosure two years ago as a summer/retirement home in the mountains. Place needed some work. Her husband passed and she is trying to get it completed.

If I get the job, it will look great standing on the deck ;)
 

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free standing

If possible, make the deck free standing and use galvanized lag bolts with washers to create a stand off tie to the rim joist--easy peasy.
 

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Gotcha. So basically it's veneer covering the rim and logs above. I don't believe the pieces that were removed are still around. So an alternative trim board is to be used, unless the builder (whom is unknown) can get replacements.
A lot of log homes are milled fairly locally. Some are still in business, some aren't. At least the profile for the half log siding isn't as complicated as getting an actual log custom milled.

Given that the wall is CMU, I'd tend to shy away from fastening a ledger board into it. Least expensive is probably hook into the rim joist. The rim joist normall isn't treated wood, and this is a good time to do a quick field treatment. I only use copper flashing on these - aluminum isn't compatible with the PT, and galvanized tends to rust too fast. You should have room for double flashing, if you want to do that. The only thing I;d check is what will happen at the door - a lot of these don't have great detailing around the door, and having the decking 1-2 inches below door level can make it more of a problem.
 

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I built a deck off a log cabin once using spacers for the ledger. I tried to think of a clean way of attaching it to the logs but spacers just seemed to make the most sense. Another thing to remember is code only allows actual logs on the first story, anything above that has to be conventional wood framed with log siding to prevent the house from shrinking too much. So if you are driving lags through the siding then you need to make sure you are hitting a stud. If your ledger is right over the concrete you should be going into solid logs though.
 
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