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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just like the title says:

When building a deck on a stucco house, do you:

Cut the stucco out for the ledger board, then install your flashing?

Drill and bolt it on over top of the stucco? (with a groove cut in the stucco for your flashing)

Other options?


What do you do, and why?
 

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kevin k said:
Just like the title says:

When building a deck on a stucco house, do you:

Cut the stucco out for the ledger board, then install your flashing?

Drill and bolt it on over top of the stucco? (with a groove cut in the stucco for your flashing)

Other options?


What do you do, and why?
Cutting out the stucco would be the proper method,but it is very important to get the lapping of flashing and paper correct to avoid future leaks/rot . The Journal of light construction has had some good artitcles on patching and repairing stucco. I assume this is a framed house not stucco over block. Other option would to build a ledge similar to a brick ledge next to existing foundation and even with bottom of ledger board,could aslo use a series of pilasters say one every 4 feet to support a doubled ledger this makes for lot less block work. Second method only works with a first floor deck.
 

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I put three decks on the back of a stucco'd 3-plex rental of mine. It was resolved the the best method (least fuss and muss) would be to pour post footings near the house and have the decks be completely septerate from the house structure.
 

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Anvil, have you been using these brackets long? Any problems with code? In Delaware code generally requires us to use 1/2 bolts/lags 16" o.c. I would think with these brackets it would be less secure because you have significantly fewer weight points pulling on the sill. For example, with a 20' deck attached directly to the sill, I'd have at least 15 different spots where I'm attached to the house, but with this bracket system it looks like you'd only have about 5 or 6 attachment points.

I see on their website they say since the brackets are aluminum, just add a barrier between the ACQ and the bracket to prevent direct contact, that makes me a little leary too. Not sure how it would hold up over time.

It looks like a great way to avoid significant flashing on long deck runs though.
 

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For corrosion resistance the cast aluminum is pretty good but you should use WR Grace's DeckProtect just as you should at the steel hangers.
http://www.graceathome.com/pages/deckingprod.htm#DECK_PROTECT

If you place the brackets every 6 ft it is equivalent to one bolt every 18". Placing them every 5'-4" would give you the equivalent to one every 16" if that is what the inspector wants. I don't remember the actual capacity of the bracket but you might need that to convince the inspector.

The goal is to not have to replace the ledger and wall framing every 20 years like I just did on my father-in-law's house. Everyone blamed the new siding installation for the leaks in the downstairs windows and I said the ledger had probably been leaking for as long as it had been in place. I got a lot of poo-poos on that until the ledger was removed and the 4x8 sill was found to be almost entirely rotted away. It's good to humble your in-laws every once in awhile.
 

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Good info. I'm definitely going to look into it. I have a huge wrap-around deck on a stucco house early next spring and there's about 100' that will need to be attached to the house. I'd rather not have to flash all of that.
Thanks again for the info.
 
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Kevin
for stucco walls, I take my circ saw/rip fence and put a 15 deg. bevel on the top edge of anyting interfacing the wall. Put 12" York roll copper flashing (copper side out) from the "inside bottom edge, neatly wrapped over inside top edge and down bevel, Install ledger normally. And carefully/neatly fair in a nice fillet of elastomeric or solar seal along joint formed along top edge of bevel and wall. This is no different, and actually easier than falshing a ledger up inder siding and I have never had a problem. Hope this helps, I can shoot you a diagram if you still dont understand.
 

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Flashing the ledger on stucco is a problem solved with a product called proteckflashing. This is simple to install and gives you the best protection money can buy. and you are not going to believe how great flashing can look.:thumbsup: This is what the doctor ordered, designed by craftsmen for craftsmen- check it out on the web, download the pdf and take the pain out of flashing.

:eek: me antenae is up, bannnn
 

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Ledgerboard on upper stucco wall for patio cover

Kevin
for stucco walls, I take my circ saw/rip fence and put a 15 deg. bevel on the top edge of anyting interfacing the wall. Put 12" York roll copper flashing (copper side out) from the "inside bottom edge, neatly wrapped over inside top edge and down bevel, Install ledger normally. And carefully/neatly fair in a nice fillet of elastomeric or solar seal along joint formed along top edge of bevel and wall. This is no different, and actually easier than falshing a ledger up inder siding and I have never had a problem. Hope this helps, I can shoot you a diagram if you still dont understand.

Kevin,

I want to add a ledgerboard onto a stucco wall for a patio cover, as apposed to a deck. I am struggling with the best method to ensure I don't get leaks, etc., but don't have as big a concern about weight - such as would be the case with a deck.

Do I cut away stucco and connect, then tar paper, flash, and re-stucco? Or do I connect directly to the interior studs through the stucco, then flash and simply run the rubberized roof coatings up over the flashing onto the stucco? Or, even simpler, can I connect the ledgerboard through the existing stucco, then heavily seal the the joint and add roofing sealer? The rubberized roofing sealer in the Tucson area typically is re-applied every 5 years.

What would you suggest?

Thanks!
Todd
 

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TPaulus,

Please go to the introduction section and do a quick intro about your business, how long, what area, etc.

Thanks and Welcome to CT:thumbsup:
 
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