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30 year novice
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a potential client that has had a previous painter apply a latex finish over the existing oil finish on the trim, we all know how that usually works out.

As it turns out it's not sticking, go figure, so she has asked me to fix the problem. I have a few different ways of handling this problem with very good success but I was wondering how other pros tackle this. Maybe there is a way I haven't thought of

The new finish has been worn away by everyday use, such as a vacuum cleaner bumping it, rubbing the frame as you walk by etc. If I were to try and sand these areas with a sponge to get rid of the edges the latex just continues to roll. What would you do to make it a durable finish?
 

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Want to play a game?
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4,522 Posts
Scuff then oil primer then latex.
 

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The Dude
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2,388 Posts
Latex can go over oil IF it's prepped right, Oil over latex never works out, the latex is too flexible and the oil cracks.

You'll have to get ALL the latex off. Down to bare wood if you have to. Maybe use a heat gun? Maybe a stripper - but then you'll have to sand, because the grain will be raised.

Encapsulating it with BIN isn't a good idea, it's also brittle, and will crack over latex, and won't fix the bonding problem even if the top coat doesn't crack.

Is it cheap readily available trim? Might be cheaper to replace it. I'm not spending an hour peeling paint off of a $10 piece of base, nor am I spending half a day stripping a $20 hollow core door.
 

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The only way it isn't sticking is the existing oil - probably gloss or semi gloss - wasn't scuffed before the latex went on. All the old latex has to come off, as already said.

I've used oil primers under latex in many situations for years - any decent latex will stick to oil, but it still needs a good surface to bond to.
 
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