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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well I've done a few countertops now. Helping out friends/family who are low on cash.

Today was a nightmare though. Substrate was sanded/clean/square/flat.

Did all the edges and nearly every corner wanted to come away. Same with the actual top. I was re-gluing half the stuff and swearing the whole way. Gave the adhesive more curing time, even tried a bit less. Kept the temperature up around 20*C.

Turns out the laminate was stored in a coil for 3+months. I used sta'put on the edges, and contact cement on the top. I'd think to blame the adhesive first. But with two different adhesives and the same problems I think it was the improper storage that killed me.

I did the best I could with everything but not super happy with the end result. Sucks when you put all your effort into something and you just can't make it work.

Has anyone had a similiar experience?
 

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Well Bubbi.... For starters,,, what was your substrate, what was your contact cement, how'd ya apply it.
 

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Get your easy button out - Laminating is easy, just like painting :laughing:

Did you use a J roller to secure the laminate? Did you try to use a hammer and block - most laminate adhesives are "PRESSURE" sensitive.

Sounds like you got a consumer grade adhesive of that brand.

What type of laminate? If it's horizontal / standard grade of a number of manufactures (thickness) you where destined to fail without letting the laminate relax.
 

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typically particleboard, this time mdf. lepage cement, rolled. What is bubbi
Bubbi is just a southern term way of saying "friend".

On MDF, it would be difficult to think that you did not get enough on the substrate....

Not sure of LePage contact cement.... but I would assume it's ok. (Went out to see what I use, but maybe I'm out.... but I just use a standard BB brand with no problem....

I'm sure you pressure rolled it.....

When I do formica, (I'm not a specialist), my sheets come flat.... so maybe you just needed to unroll it for a few days to let it flatten....

I've really never had to take it back up and re-glue it.... not sure if that is feasable application technique/alternative.
 

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When I do formica, (I'm not a specialist), my sheets come flat.... so maybe you just needed to unroll it for a few days to let it flatten....

I've really never had to take it back up and re-glue it.... not sure if that is feasable application technique/alternative.
formica, or wilsonart, or nevamar .... my sheets come in, rolled from the distributor. They need to be stored flat. But even so occasionally a sheet or two stays rolled for a long time. Rarely is there this big of an issue, however certain brands are very thick non-post forming standard grade and left rolled up.

Taking it up is easy, lacquer thinner with a squirt/glue bottle, if it's standard solvent based cement.
 

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Contact cement both surfaces and dry till its not tacky... If your not floating out of the room from the glue, it's prolly no good. Lol
 

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If it was from the roll, only the ends would be trying to pull away... Did you vacuum after sanding?
 

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master hacker of wood
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I've had some nightmare jobs but they came from my bro in law who got kicked off the job for telling them the way it is lol

I have a counter waiting to be done so maybe I should cross my fingers!!!

I did trade my best friend his tops for my carpet in my house,,
It must of been 3 am and were ready to glue and I was cutting the laminate more too size but when I turned it over I cut the wrong side of the line,
The router just barely ticked off what was left but I pulled it off!!
 

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My experience from when I used to do this for a living is that the humidity is as important, if not more important than the temperature. If your glue is really grabbing like it should, and you lay it down from the center out, it won't matter how long it was rolled up

Good luck and have fun, be careful of the paper cuts from that stuff.
 

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Can i ask a dumb question? I have done a few tops on workbenches for myself. How though do you get fairly neat long strips cut for the edges, i have tried the scoring tools and blades, can never seem to get a clean break
 

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mudpad said:
I always rip em on a table saw.
They dont wanna shatter?
 

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master hacker of wood
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They make a slitter for doing the edges, but I use a table saw oversize them and when I'm routing I spread Vaseline on it to keep from burning it,,

But I mostly do wood edge because it's a lot easier and I make it look more stout by widening it!!
 

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I always just clamp a straight edge to the stock and use a router to cut the strips. Same for piecing out a large sheet
 
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They dont wanna shatter?

Nope. Biggest problem is the laminate wants to slip under your fence, keep it up a little with some sacrificial plywood (which can serve as zero clearance as well. High tooth count or plywood blade helps. You need a large table with outfeed and/ or a helper to support the floppy crap.
 

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FRAME2FINISH said:
They make a slitter for doing the edges, but I use a table saw oversize them and when I'm routing I spread Vaseline on it to keep from burning it,,

But I mostly do wood edge because it's a lot easier and I make it look more stout by widening it!!
I always like the wood edge. But was doing it mainly. Cause i would wreck sheets trying to get rough cut strips
 
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