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:eek: I live in a manufactured home with a raised foundation on 5 acres of 4000 foot high desert. I am a professional animal trainer with 4 large dogs and some cats of my own. because of dirt and pets carpet is out of the question. Tile I'm told is also a bad idea because of the raised foundation. Laminate seems like the best option (I hate vinyl and it off-gases toxins).

I have been looking at two different options in Laminate:
Armstrong heritage pine from Lowe's
Quickstep Classic Uniclic Planks from ifloors

The quickstep has an AC rating of 4 and use level of 32 which is one point higher than the Armstrong. The quickstep appears to be the better choice since it seems that scratching will be my greatest concern.

What do you think?

Assuming Laminate is the best option is cork underlayment a good choice? since my home is not on a slab? I'm worried about the floor being noisy.

I would like to put laminate in the utility room (washer/dryer) and the 2 bathrooms. If the laminate is glued as I plan to do in the kitchen would this be OK? If not, what would you recommend?

Please advise :confused:
De Ann
 

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I would recommend a high pressure lam to start

Pergo Select
Wilsonart Estate Plus

Only use a different underlay if the manufacturer will still warranty.
 

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i'd go with the scratch resistant laminate if i were you. when that's installed, usually a thin (about 1/16") padded underlayment is put down first. anything more than that probably won't do much to quiet your floors any more. speaking of using cork, they do make cork flooring. if they have a pattern you can stand to look at, it would be better than lam. ,and quieter too. the good stuff is very sturdy, and stands up to about anything. including water and animals.
 

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You can by 1/8" to 1/4" cork underlayment...comes in sheets or rolls. Works pretty good...you still should use the foam underlayment that is recommended with the floor. In a manufactered home, just float the floors...please do not glue it down, this is because most of these homes have partical board subfloor that would really be destroyed if you had to fix your floor for any reason. Just float it.
 
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