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Anyone have experience with applying a new laminate directly over an old laminate? Curious if this is possible and what to look for.
 

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If you're talking countertops, it's cheaper to go with post form from one of the box stores. The only counter than you can laminate directly on top of is one with the square edge. And yeah, you can get a decent enough bond, but you're still left with the old substrate under the existing laminate and any problems that it might have. Like the inevitable water damage.

So, yeah, but why bother?
 

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all the above....and for what it's worth

Done lots of it in commercial setting. This is actually more difficult than doing new. If you have not done a lot of new laminate, refacing can eat your lunch real fast. Not the option of choice, but if the customer will pay and you arr really up to it

Look for:
-Bad substrate-swelling particle board, warpage..any of this and it's a no go make new.
-Loose laminate- pull it up and break it off - Bondo is your friend
-You can usually pull up the old laminate if it's real bad by flushing between the substrate and laminate with lacquer thinner if you need to remove entire faces. Need a squeeze bottle and a couple of gallons of thinner. Floor protection, it's a mess.
-Sand all surfaces with 120-150 grit till it has a good white haze (not form the dust)
-Seaming is a b:censored:h, pull the backsplash if at all possible and make new
-Use a real commercial grade contact cement-Wilsonart 500, 600 will work the best. The box store contact cements are "pro-sumer" grade and you will not be happy with the tack time and actual adhesion over time.

Typically it is best to fabricate new or buy new.
 

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Interior Remodeling
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Texas Wax said:
all the above....and for what it's worth

Done lots of it in commercial setting. This is actually more difficult than doing new. If you have not done a lot of new laminate, refacing can eat your lunch real fast. Not the option of choice, but if the customer will pay and you arr really up to it

Look for:
-Bad substrate-swelling particle board, warpage..any of this and it's a no go make new.
-Loose laminate- pull it up and break it off - Bondo is your friend
-You can usually pull up the old laminate if it's real bad by flushing between the substrate and laminate with lacquer thinner if you need to remove entire faces. Need a squeeze bottle and a couple of gallons of thinner. Floor protection, it's a mess.
-Sand all surfaces with 120-150 grit till it has a good white haze (not form the dust)
-Seaming is a b:censored:h, pull the backsplash if at all possible and make new
-Use a real commercial grade contact cement-Wilsonart 500, 600 will work the best. The box store contact cements are "pro-sumer" grade and you will not be happy with the tack time and actual adhesion over time.

Typically it is best to fabricate new or buy new.
Exactly what he said. I very rarely relaminate over existing. Peel it and start new. Never get as good of a bond as you do with fresh substrate.
 
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