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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just had my laminate installed and it looks great.My concern is that in one room,the laminate gives slightly when I step on it.The guys poured self leveler over the entire floor and it seemed flat enough prior to the install.I guess I didn't check it thoroughly enough for flatness.Is it ok if the floor gives just a little in places or should I have them pick up the floor and fill these spots?I went with Quick-Step UF916.
 

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A little give is probably not much to be concerned about. I t depends on how much though, any flex in a floating floor can cause joints to seperate or become damaged. It's hard to tell with the floor installed, it's very destructive to take it up to find out.

Did you get a decent warrantee on the installation? If so I waould say wait untill and if it becomes a problem. Keep a goot eye out for joint seperation and don't let your warrantee run out if a problem develops.

You'll need to use your judgment on how much flex you're having and if you think it's too much to let go.

HTH,
Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks Don.That's a weight off my shoulders.This floor does have a 25 year warranty if installed correctly.My installer has 20 years in flooring and is a member of the BBB.
I wasn't sure how this warranty stuff works and what recourse I had if my tongue and grooves snap off.I really don't want to ask the guys to take the floor up.I want to just live with it.It's really just a minor give in a couple of spots.
 

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Knight, A floating floor does just that, floats. The underlay determines many factors such as vertical movement, R-value and sound absorbtion. Personally, I like a little 'give' to the floor, it makes it easier on the feet and back.
With the rep that your installer has, I would not worry about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
While I have your attention,I'd like to ask your opinion on the laminate in front of my bathroom sink,which is part of my master bedroom floor.Should this area be sealed or glued together in case of a spill from the sink?How do you do that?
 

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Knight, I have a product to address this problem. The patent has been applied for. That should clear this problem up in the next few months, I'll let you know when it does.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Teetorbilt said:
Knight, I have a product to address this problem. The patent has been applied for. That should clear this problem up in the next few months, I'll let you know when it does.
I assume you're referring to my bathroom being sealed?
 

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My application is for topside sealing only. Anything that creeps underneath is on you.
I really oppose bathroom installations, just too much to go wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Teetorbilt said:
My application is for topside sealing only. Anything that creeps underneath is on you.
I really oppose bathroom installations, just too much to go wrong.
I had no choice,my bathroom sink adjoins to my master.Toilet and shower in seperate room."My application is for topside sealing only",<--right,I want to seal the v-grooves and near the baseboards.(I have the 4 perspective bevelled edges.)
 

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I still reccomend tile or other flooring for humid areas.
On the soapbox, I still don't understand why laminate manufacturers don't accept the fact that their products may be used in baths and kitchens. The first one out with a waterproof product is going to make some major bucks.
 

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Always ask the expert. Glad to see you back, Flor.
 

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You can seal the perimeter with silicone to prevent moisture getting in from the top.

Don
 

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The glue used in glue together is an acrylic and I would believe that it would be watertight although I have never tested it. Glue a couple of scraps together and put some water on it. If it doesn't swell up in an hour I'd say that its watertight.
 

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some laminates are so tight without glue, that you cannot put glue in it.
like the UNILIN joint on Quickstep.
if it's possible to glue the joint then do it. it's cheap insurance.
 

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Flor, I was thinking of just putting the glue on the top side of the tongue, not in the groove. Should have been more specific.
 
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