Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Repair/Remodeling Tech.
Joined
·
1,645 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm putting laminate flooring into 4 rooms that form a square (2 in front, 2 in back...as opposed to 4 rooms in a straight line) and each room is open to the next. I'd Like to keep it all continuous with no thresholds. My questions are:

1) If by some miracle the first room I put in and the last room come out to a full width piece between them (in a doorway, jamb to jamb direction...just 2 single pieces), how would I put the locks together on the last 2 pieces? I have this vision of lifting both pieces at the same time like this / \ and then trying to lock them together on the way down....would that even work?

2) If they don't come out to exactly a full width piece, I guess I'd rip a piece to look as seamless as possible, and..........(method of attachment is still an ongoing thought process. Glue that ONE piece down? Nail that one piece down?)

I stress the "ONE" because obviously the rest of the floor is floating. I can't imagine that one piece being glued/nailed down would "unfloat" the whole floor and cause failure, but that's why I'm asking.

BTW, this is my own home (if I didn't know how to finish it, I wouldn't start it for a customer :) )

I hope I made the scenario clear. It makes sense in my mind, but I've been looking at it and thinking about it for the past 2 days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,437 Posts
So you want to start at opposite ends and meet in the middle? Why? With hardwood you can start in the middle and use a reverse spline. Not sure with your particular flooring if you can do a reverse spline some manufacturers make them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,214 Posts
treat it like tile.....start in the middle?

I would try and break the float between the rooms if your talking about doorways, I have a problem child apt that has 2 rooms with a short hall and things float different......the hallway gets real tight and waves
 

·
Paul
Joined
·
4,120 Posts
I wouldn't start in the middle. Go off of the exterior wall if possible. Measure out and see where a full plank is going to hit in the doorways and adjust the width of your start row to make the joints fall the best they can between doorways of the hall. When you have a problem piece/row to get in just use a sharp chisel and remove the locking ridge on the bottom side of the groove edge and glue those pieces in with titebond.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TAHomeRepairs

·
Repair/Remodeling Tech.
Joined
·
1,645 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I think I didn't explain it very well. Like I said, it made sense in my mind, but that's probably the only place.

In the picture:

The thin lines are the direction the planks are running. (from the front of the house towards the back).

The 1st, 2nd, etc. is the order I have/and will have to now go in. I started in the left front room (1st), working together with the left back room (2nd) and into the right back room (3rd), which is where I am now. As I move into the right front room (4th), I'll end up working it "backwards" heading back toward the left front room (1st).

When I get to the doorway circled in red, is where I'm talking about. The house is 80 years old, so I'm thinking the odds of having a full piece meeting another full piece when I reach the "red" doorway, is next to none, lol. Just looking for ideas...someone may have something I haven't thought of, which is basically:

If it's a full piece, figure out a way to lock it in, or rip off the tongue/lock and nail it or glue it

If it's a ripped piece, lay it in and nail or glue it.

EDIT: added the picture...my dumb a$$ forgot :)

EDIT again: BTW, the arrows are the direction I was laying the planks.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,437 Posts
I'm not sure I understand why all your arrows don't point to the right.
Ya you just need to lay from one direction. There's no need to change direction. Just keep laying from the 1st room into the 4th, as long as your planks are kept straight there shouldn't be an issue with the 3rd room meeting with the 4th room. Is it a floating floor?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,197 Posts
Install them all in the same direction. Continue 4 from 1 through the doorway and pick up 3 and 4 together at that doorway. Trust that they will line up.
Yes, doing all those rooms without an expansion joint somewhere (at the doorways) you're taking a chance that things will expand differently. I've done it in my house, front room down the hallway and into three different rooms without a problem. I've seen it become a problem elsewhere though too, one in particular was laid in the winter/cold house and then when summer hit things buckled in some areas so I think they were bound to have a problem regardless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,751 Posts
I would strike some chalk lines parallel at the start and toward the finish wall where you could constantly check to make sure the "stuff " your putting down stays straight, just as others work to the back, simultaneous , thru that little door, not that it's supposed to be done that way as far as needing a transition at one point or another.
 

·
Particulate Filter
Joined
·
4,430 Posts
Man, if it was my home I would install a nail down prefinished or site finished tru hardwood floor. Decent laminate costs the same as solid. The time is the same to lay it, just have to take two days to sand and finish or pay 20 percent more for prefunished.

I layed 3 1/4 rift and quartered white oak in my place. Its awesome, makes my home worth more and itll be there long after Im dead and gone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
Buy a 1/8" top bearing slot cutter, make some splines by ripping up 1/8" masonite and install it back to back at the two openings along the center wall. It's easy to do, and people will think you're a genius after the fact. (you don't have to give me credit hehe)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
Waitaminit! Why not start at the bottom of the image and simply climb up? It's laminate, for pooksake. Seems like an imaginary problem. Laminate is a room full of straightedges. Moveable ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,572 Posts
Waitaminit! Why not start at the bottom of the image and simply climb up? It's laminate, for pooksake. Seems like an imaginary problem. Laminate is a room full of straightedges. Moveable ones.
Agreed. It makes no sense to ever have to have two edges that need splined in the above scenario.:thumbsup:
 

·
Repair/Remodeling Tech.
Joined
·
1,645 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ok fellas, we got it done. The one comment above "trust that they will line up" eventually sank in.

If you have a straight line up the middle of rooms 1 and 2, 40 rows to the right, whether there's a wall in the way or not (like with rooms 3 and 4), it should line up.

And it did. I ended up running everything from left to right instead of what my drawing showed...and it worked out great.

Thanks to everyone for all comments and suggestions. :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,841 Posts
As everyone else said. :) (im late to the party).

Laminate is way cheaper out here (for med grade stuff). About 2 dollars sq/ft. Finished stuff is about 3-5, depending. between the padding, sometimes the prices are as you said- damn close.
 

·
The Finisher
Joined
·
1,396 Posts
I hope you're ready to fix all the gapping in the doorways once the RH starts changing.

Standard rule is to separate all rooms with a t-molding for stability. Especially when the span is over 30'.

Good luck!
 

·
Paul
Joined
·
4,120 Posts
I hope you're ready to fix all the gapping in the doorways once the RH starts changing.

Standard rule is to separate all rooms with a t-molding for stability. Especially when the span is over 30'.

Good luck!
That's a rule for Diy use IMO. It's there, the manufacturers put it there to cover their asses and I understand why. That being said, a molding in every doorway looks like complete crap. It's a good way to make a nice house look like a trailer.

Common sense and experience in how the stuff moves will allow you to install it a tad different. You can always install a molding later if necessary too.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top