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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I have been reading in the forum for sometime now and picked up some great info :thumbsup: I wondered though; if anyone can help with my dilemma?

I am about to extend a first floor in a fairly new condo with a more experienced general contractor. The GC insist's that it is okay to place a wall plate around the perimeter wall, fastened back to the metal studs with lag screws and then hang the new floor joists (with joist hangers) to this wall plate? The floor extension is to create a walk in wardrobe so there will be a fair amount of weight placed on this floor.

Will lag bolts into metal studs be sufficient to hold this floor and the dead load? Is their any data on pullout resistance for lag screws into metal stud anywhere?

I am supposed to be completing this job tomorrow and the GC has no A/drawings or structural drawings. It has me a little worried so any reassurance would be appreciated.

Thanks..
 

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The floor extension is to create a walk in wardrobe so there will be a fair amount of weight placed on this floor.

Will lag bolts into metal studs be sufficient to hold this floor and the dead load? Is their any data on pullout resistance for lag screws into metal stud anywhere?

........GC has no A/drawings or structural drawings
Hard telling, not knowing



It has me a little worried so any reassurance would be appreciated.
Anyone who would give you reassurance would be a fool. You are right to be worried
 

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Another point:

Is wood construction allowed at this location? Often, when you see metal studs, it is indicative of non combustible construction being required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Another point:

Is wood construction allowed at this location? Often, when you see metal studs, it is indicative of non combustible construction being required.

Hi,

Thanks for reply. The existing floor joists are timber and are bearing on supporting walls. The supporting walls do not extend into the area i have been asked to frame which is why they have asked us to tie into the metal studs of the internal walls with a wall plate and lag screws. IMO the floor would be considered load bearing and i am concerned that the lag screws would not be enough? Would it make a difference if they were heavy gauge studs?

Thanks.
 

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"please complete your profile, and continue to the intro page and tell us a little about yourself and your professional experience, thankyou and welcome to ct" gmod
 

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Hi,

Thanks for reply. The existing floor joists are timber and are bearing on supporting walls. The supporting walls do not extend into the area i have been asked to frame which is why they have asked us to tie into the metal studs of the internal walls with a wall plate and lag screws. IMO the floor would be considered load bearing and i am concerned that the lag screws would not be enough? Would it make a difference if they were heavy gauge studs?

Thanks.
This sounds like a mess, and you would do well not to perform the work without a set of engineer approved drawings. It's hard to say from your description, but it sounds like you're turning a non-load bearing partition wall into a load bearing wall for your new floor.

That's a big no-no if the loads aren't transfered properly.
 

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I can't figure out what you are saying but IMO based on my experience, a metal plate fastened to a metal wall should be welded if it's going to carry any weight at all. If not, it should be bolted at least. No Screws.
Why you'd want to run floor joists off a wall studs is confusing. If a floor plan is being enlarged you have to set the floor on something. Is it going to be cantilevered?
 

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a metal plate fastened to a metal wall should be welded if it's going to carry any weight at all
The welding of metal studs can bring up several issues during the welding process. Metal studs are cold-rolled steel, so welding affects the heat treatment standards of the steel. Also, the surface of the studs is coated with zinc and other metals. During welding these metals do become oxidized and airborne, and get incorporated into the weld metal. Because the welds in metal studs are comparatively small, this material can substantially affect the welds. This can make it difficult to quantitatively asses the strength of these joints.

Welding metal studs is common in the construction industry, but is in many cases avoided where strength is critical. Hangers, clips, bolts, and even screws are used in these situations
 

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this is VERY SIMPLE. don't make a mountain out of it. don't hire an engineer or architect.
1. This is just a 'walk in closet' you're building so there will not be an exceptional amount of weight on it.
2. Unless the metal studs are 16 ga. or heavier, do not bolt a ledger joist to them.
3. get wood studs or 18 ga minimum studs and put them along side the exstn'g. light ga. material .
4. do not use ledger joist ! get c-joist track and tek-screw and bolt to the heavy gauge or wood studs you placed in the existing wall. frame with c-joist and sheathe as you normally would.
5. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
 

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this is VERY SIMPLE. don't make a mountain out of it. don't hire an engineer or architect.
1. This is just a 'walk in closet' you're building so there will not be an exceptional amount of weight on it.
2. Unless the metal studs are 16 ga. or heavier, do not bolt a ledger joist to them.
3. get wood studs or 18 ga minimum studs and put them along side the exstn'g. light ga. material .
4. do not use ledger joist ! get c-joist track and tek-screw and bolt to the heavy gauge or wood studs you placed in the existing wall. frame with c-joist and sheathe as you normally would.
5. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
No drawing... No idea of how big this "walk-in" closet is... and an unclear description of the existing conditions.

You'll have to explain to me how giving structural advice sight-unseen is either "VERY SIMPLE" or a good idea. :no:
 

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No drawing... No idea of how big this "walk-in" closet is... and an unclear description of the existing conditions.

You'll have to explain to me how giving structural advice sight-unseen is either "VERY SIMPLE" or a good idea. :no:
:laughing:
does sound a bit carefree doesn't it ? i'm not trying to direct the OP on how to build it, as I do not have those details. I'm trying to give the OP a different perspective on the approach. I'm assuming they have somewhat of an idea on what they are doing. maybe he's over thinking it.
 

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this is VERY SIMPLE. don't make a mountain out of it. don't hire an engineer or architect.
1. This is just a 'walk in closet' you're building so there will not be an exceptional amount of weight on it.
2. Unless the metal studs are 16 ga. or heavier, do not bolt a ledger joist to them.
3. get wood studs or 18 ga minimum studs and put them along side the exstn'g. light ga. material .
4. do not use ledger joist ! get c-joist track and tek-screw and bolt to the heavy gauge or wood studs you placed in the existing wall. frame with c-joist and sheathe as you normally would.
5. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
i'm not trying to direct the OP on how to build it,
Huh? Sure seems like you were
 

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Motomoto -

Are the steel studs just the "wrinkled tin" variety or are they real structural meant to carry loads more than pictures and no lateral or eccentric loads?

Lag bolts might have a large diameter, but they are limited by what they are connected to and many steel studs are not structural.
 

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without knowing what kind of steel studs it is hard to say. I don't have alot of experience with steel studs anyway, but I would say you would want to weld or thru-bolt at the bare minimum. As far as I'm concerned lags are for wood.
 

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If you noticed, you were directing the OP
hmmm....i could see why you would think that, however I was not. I'm sure the OP understands it's just an opinion. However, if it is a 'smallish' walk in closet,and it must be done, reinforcing the existing wall with solid wood or 16ga stud would be a wise move. Bolting through C JOIST into 16 ga material with carriage bolts would also work better in this case. If it must be done.
 
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