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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Has anyone had any experience with collapse or failure on ladder jacks?
I use type1 250# ladders, which is what I understand to be the minimum. It is my fear that a ladder rung will snap before the jack does.
It's hard to get specifics online, but qualcom implies no more than 250# per jack....with my belt loaded up that's damn near me.... then the plank, other guy....box of coils, some hardi shingle...
laying awake tonight thinking about it.
How can you they say 250#, but mention a plank and 2 people...
So what is really safe?
 

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diplomat
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If you're both 250 pounds, you better not both be on one side! I've seen some pretty fat guys on those jacks though.
 

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I've never done the math, but you want the strongest ladders possible to support the jacks. You should be safe with the plank and two ladders, but the stronger the ladders the less bounce you will have.

I like ladder jacks, they are convenient. But they are not the safest kind of scaffold, do some careful planning, use a third ladder for access, and you still need fall protection using either a harness or railing. Make sure you have a safety meeting with your guys, the last thing you want is to throw a rookie up there and the next thing you know he'll be stepping past the jack flipping the plank up.

I can't imagine the rung snapping with your 250lb ladder and two people, I've spent a lot of time on ladder jacks and never seen that happen. But you would be safer with a 300 lb or more because of less bounce.
 

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I have a set of heavy duty Werner ladder jacks that attach over three rungs instead of two. Those with 300# rated ladders make for a solid set up.

With your set up it sounds like you are aware that you may be approaching the limits of your set up.
I think instead of the rung snapping (which would really suck) I would have someone observe how much your ladders are bending when you have everything loaded up.
My primary concern would be excess bending of the ladder, it would only take an unexpected shock load to ruin your day.
Stay safe.
 

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I've always preferred pump jacks over ladder jacks. I think the capacity is about the same and it is much easier to set up and move up and down. With the ladder jacks you set up the ladders, make sure they're secure, put the jacks up, then carry a plank up to them. Then do it all again when you work your way up about five feet or so of wall. Then at some point (assuming that your running siding off of them), the ladders are in the way.
 

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stacker of sticks
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Exlud said:
I've always preferred pump jacks over ladder jacks. I think the capacity is about the same and it is much easier to set up and move up and down. With the ladder jacks you set up the ladders, make sure they're secure, put the jacks up, then carry a plank up to them. Then do it all again when you work your way up about five feet or so of wall. Then at some point (assuming that your running siding off of them), the ladders are in the way.
Ladder jacks usually are used for roofing, I have a couple pair of the 3 rung jacks. I think they are qual craft. But I've had 4 sq of shingles and 2 guys on them with no problems. And even though it's got 3 hooks it only makes contact with the top one.
 

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I'm pretty sure mine are two rungs and 150# stamped in them.

With a walk board, this fat boy and three bundles of shingles it's about 600#. For piece of mind I load two bundles on one end and the third on my starting end.

The three rung ones I've seen only span three rungs connecting with two (skipping the center rung). These don't work for me as I sometimes hang them off the inside for siding and soffit work and without fail one rung will be on one section of the extension and the other will want to be on other section of the extension.


Disclaimer: My experiences and techniques may or may not be safe for you, always refer to your handy dandy local OSHA regulations.
 

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Before any consideration is given to the functional safety of ladders and scaffold equipment in an assembly, one must be confident that each piece of equipment is in good and serviceable condition.

I mention this because over the years I have seen so many pieces of equipment on jobs that were long past their service life.

250# ladders with jacks and a plank (set up between the ladder and the building) would be a one man set up for me. With jacks and plank outside the ladders, maybe I would feel better, but I have always used 300# ladders and three rung jacks.

The stresses on the ladders and jacks would be considerably higher when attached to the inside of the rungs than the outside.
 

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Ladder jacks usually are used for roofing, I have a couple pair of the 3 rung jacks. I think they are qual craft. But I've had 4 sq of shingles and 2 guys on them with no problems. And even though it's got 3 hooks it only makes contact with the top one.
Your point may be that they can handle a lot, OK.

It is, however, completely irresponsible to put that kind of load on the assembly.
 

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Mr Latone said:
Your point may be that they can handle a lot, OK. It is, however, completely irresponsible to put that kind of load on the assembly.
Even with 1400 lbs of shingles and guys that's half of the breaking point of the system.
 

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Before any consideration is given to the functional safety of ladders and scaffold equipment in an assembly, one must be confident that each piece of equipment is in good and serviceable condition.

I mention this because over the years I have seen so many pieces of equipment on jobs that were long past their service life.

250# ladders with jacks and a plank (set up between the ladder and the building) would be a one man set up for me. With jacks and plank outside the ladders, maybe I would feel better, but I have always used 300# ladders and three rung jacks.

The stresses on the ladders and jacks would be considerably higher when attached to the inside of the rungs than the outside.
True. Only for soffit and siding.
 

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Even with 1400 lbs of shingles and guys that's half of the breaking point of the system.
Sure but it is beyond the duty rating. And the failure points are established in controlled settings, ideal conditions and static loads.

Working outside the duty rating is just bad practice for lots of reasons.
 

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Mr Latone said:
Sure but it is beyond the duty rating. And the failure points are established in controlled settings, ideal conditions and static loads. Working outside the duty rating is just bad practice for lots of reasons.
do you ever have a guy bring shingles up a ladder? He's probably above the ladders rating.

So what happens if my ladder jack broke? Someone gets their nuts pinched.
 
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