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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a client that is adding a check out counter with a knee wall and cabinets in an existing tenant space (Construction type III B). I'm coming in 1/2 way into the project...

I typically leave construction means & methods up the contractor, but the tenant is allowed to act as the GC in my city and I would like to help him (and myself...the dumb architect :) ) understand the construction requirements in this alteration. He has the counter mocked up and I have some questions:

  • Can you attach the knee wall on top of carpet tiles?
  • If allowed, will the bottom plate need to be treated?
  • Can you attach wall on top of 3/4" slotted wall paneling, or does it need to go back to framing?

Thanks!!

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I'd have no problem doing that.

The problem you can have with carpet underneath is water, if it gets underneath, is going to just sit there. Best plan if that happens is move all that and dry it out. PT would be a good detail, since it will tolerate small amounts of moisture and not rot.
 

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1. Can you attach the knee wall on top of carpet tiles?
2. If allowed, will the bottom plate need to be treated?
3. Can you attach wall on top of 3/4" slotted wall paneling, or does it need to go back to framing?
1. You can but the proper way would be to remove the strip of floor covering for the wall to sit on the floor. In the real world, it probably makes no difference.
2. Assuming concrete under the carpet, due to moisture transference, you should use a pt bottom plate.
3. You can attach to the wall paneling if the fastener you use is long enough to penetrate through the wall paneling and into a structural member of the wall.

Since it's just a build out, there is nothing wrong with what the picture shows. The only concern I would have is the wall attaching to the paneling is secured properly with a fastener long enough to reach a stud.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'd have no problem doing that.

The problem you can have with carpet underneath is water, if it gets underneath, is going to just sit there. Best plan if that happens is move all that and dry it out. PT would be a good detail, since it will tolerate small amounts of moisture and not rot.
I will suggest PT, but am I correct in understanding that it would not be required here? And thanks for the reply!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
1. You can but the proper way would be to remove the strip of floor covering for the wall to sit on the floor. In the real world, it probably makes no difference.
2. Assuming concrete under the carpet, due to moisture transference, you should use a pt bottom plate.
3. You can attach to the wall paneling if the fastener you use is long enough to penetrate through the wall paneling and into a structural member of the wall.

Since it's just a build out, there is nothing wrong with what the picture shows. The only concern I would have is the wall attaching to the paneling is secured properly with a fastener long enough to reach a stud.
Thanks! I will verify how the panels were attached.
 

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Why not make the countertop. cabinets, and wall one unit and just set it in place as you would any large furnishing... ?

Is the wall demising or a decorative panel attachment ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Why not make the countertop. cabinets, and wall one unit and just set it in place as you would any large furnishing... ?

Is the wall demising or a decorative panel attachment ?
I suppose it is demising (separating the retail area from the work area) and there will be electrical ran in the wall and have decorative cladding on the wall.
 

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I will suggest PT, but am I correct in understanding that it would not be required here? And thanks for the reply!
In a retail space you would expect the wall and plates to all be metal.
To answer your question, not required but recommended.
 

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I suppose it is demising (separating the retail area from the work area) and there will be electrical ran in the wall and have decorative cladding on the wall.

Assuming the existing is a firewall. it will be best not to perforate it with anything more than fasteners attaching the new wall to a stud.

If the occupant is using an experienced 'tenant finish' contractor, that contractor should know the local code applications.
 
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