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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The attached images show an architect's scheme for built-in dining seating in a small house, and around the corner, a small desk with drawers and shelves.

I did a model of the house in Chief Architect, and did the built-ins using Sketchup, importing the SU items into Chief. All this, to study the arrangement, and work out in my head how the desk and shelf stuff might be done.

The pic in blue and white is from my model. The one in color is from the architect's site.

Those side stacks of drawers are in frameless boxes, and are each about 12" width. The knee hole between the stacks is only 38", but remember, this is going into a small house. I am working right now with a laptop on a small desk with only a 21" wide knee hole.

That little peekaboo window opening, inside casings, is 14w x 14.5h.

What would you change in the scheme?

Work like this might be greatly enabled with a Domino, don't you think?

I posted this on another forum, and am now posting here to get a wider group of commenters.

Yes, I know the desk chair is sort of in the way of the door, but it is a small house, tight spaces, designed for just one or two people.
 

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Ditch the desk. No one uses them anymore. It's either a laptop at the kitchen table or a tablet in an easy chair. The banquette would benefit greatly by better clearance between it and the island. It looks way too small as is.
 

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x2 with Live... Definitely ditch the desk and utilize the extra space for better use and more open kitchen, especially this being a small house.
Even in larger homes I forgot when last time we did a kitchen with a desk being there.
I remember desks were a big thing being part of the kitchen design in the 70-80s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. Wife is old-fashioned, and uses her desk every day, so we think will be using it.
 

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One could reverse the hinge side of the door and have it swing out of the space and that should help with the chair issue.

Also, one could put an opening in the wall to the right of the desk, behind the settee; that would make the desk area less claustrophobic.
 

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One could reverse the hinge side of the door and have it swing out of the space and that should help with the chair issue.

Also, one could put an opening in the wall to the right of the desk, behind the settee; that would make the desk area less claustrophobic.
You still have to walk through the door and around a chair with someone in it
 

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Yes, but it would minimize the disruption and when one is working with limited areas and or budgets, compromises are always part of the solution
 

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Remove the drawers next to the door, shorten the top to 18", use a chair without arms to fit under the top. The person at the desk will now face the door wall. If a computer is used, get an all in one, mount it to the wall.

Tom
 

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Yes, but it would minimize the disruption and when one is working with limited areas and or budgets, compromises are always part of the solution
Oh I understand, I did one several years ago and did it for the same reason. It was tolerable at first but became much less so as time passed, now it is not used and we are trying to relocate it away from a traffic area. I and my customer wished we never put it there, that space could have been used for storage for less used items.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Some of you may be trying to create space and passageways where maybe none is needed.

The door swings out by design, and you can see the knob to know how it swings.

This architect is known for creating tightly orchestrated interiors for small houses, meant for one person or a couple, in which a whole lot of the furniture is built in. Thus the seating for the dining, and the desk. Think the cabin of a sailboat, or an Airstream trailer. Of course one might have to move if the other needs to get by.

Whoever modeled the chair with armrests in the pic at the architect's plans web page, was not thinking about the whole thing. There are chairs just like the one shown, that do not have armrests, and will fit snugly into the desk knee hole so as to allow easy access in and out the door.

The door goes to a back deck and porch, and it is out there that one might have an outdoor grille. Easy access is important.

The desk isn't so much for doing work with a laptop or browsing the intertoobz, but is where one opens and reads mail, and writes checks, letters, notes, etc. With iPads and smartphones, browsing is where ever you want.

In the attached pic I show some of my thoughts about how the casework for this desk-and-shelves thing might go together.

The exposed carcase sides for the drawerstacks visible in the kneehole are of 19mm baltic birch, into which 1/8 w x 1/4 d kerfs are sawn to align with the margins between the drawerfronts, maintaining the horizontal lines and wrapping.

The vertical panel fronts of the side-shelving is imagined as in 3/4 veneer-core hardwood plywood, edgebanded with 3mm species and hopefully grain-matched to the faces so as to appear seamless.

The R side of the whole thing, done up to look like the exterior wall, is a 1" thick sandwich of 1/2" MDF outside, and 12mm baltic birch inside, the MDF extending in and on the studs of the wall and running to the window, the BB inside only where the shelf box is.

A lot of the joints in the upper works of this arrangement just butt, and will involve biscuits, dowels, or those great little Festool dominos.
 

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