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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm installing new cabinetry for a 10x10 kitchen. The 36" wall cabs are installed (for 8' ceilings). I am installing a vertical filler above the top rail of the face frame, then crown on that, but the tops of the cabs are not very flat and in plane with each other due to the cabinetry itself. Everything else is level, plumb, true, in plane, etc.).

What do you think about running a block plane up there on the top side of the top rail to level it out for the filler piece, or what other options do I have to deal with the gap I will have in spots? There are just some bowed high spots near a couple corners of some of the cabs. For what it's worth, they are HD's American Woodmark, Charlottesville (maple), full overlay, auburn glaze.

Thanks.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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You could do that with a block plane or sanding block or whatever. But you'll never get it perfect. Either Put the filler in front of the cabinet or you'll need to put some kind of a molding in front of the joint which will likely not be perfect.
 

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How far out are they, and is it really noticeable? Can you move the filler forward or back so that the reveal hides or de-emphasizes the unevenness? Is it reasonable to expect better from that cabinet line? (Not a rhetorical question; I don't know). Can you add a different trim or moulding? I'd probably try a bunch of other techniques before getting out the plane.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You could do that with a block plane or sanding block or whatever. But you'll never get it perfect. Either Put the filler in front of the cabinet or you'll need to put some kind of a molding in front of the joint which will likely not be perfect.
Thanks. Not much room on the face due to the overlay, but I'll have a closer look. The other issue is I have no light rail to balance out that look (budget breaker, if you can believe that). Decisions, decisions.
 

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Drop the doors as far as reasonable, rabbet out the filler deep enough to hide the imperfections in the top rails and install crown. A 1/4" shoulder on the rabbet leaves enough meat to use finish screws through the top rails for attachment of the filler.

It's not a perfect solution, but the cabinets aren't perfect either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
How far out are they, and is it really noticeable? Can you move the filler forward or back so that the reveal hides or de-emphasizes the unevenness? Is it reasonable to expect better from that cabinet line? (Not a rhetorical question; I don't know). Can you add a different trim or moulding? I'd probably try a bunch of other techniques before getting out the plane.
First time I've worked with this line. Would do it again for the right person, but anyway...There were a couple issues with the finish, but nothing that can't be attributed to "working with natural products".

As for the gap, I've got 1/16 x 1' in a couple spots, if not a hair more. Bugs me. You've got me thinking about the trim options. Maybe I'll just pin something simple over the seam.:thumbup:
 

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The vertical filler has me puzzled...

Is it just an extension 1X?

Maybe rabbet that piece so there's like a 1/8 x 1/8 lip that you can drop down over the face...
 

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You are they forgot to order the pc of trim with a dado on it . It has a dado on the top and a decorative edge on the front. That goes on the top of the cabinets and the filler slips into the dado. That pc also protrudes out from the faceframe to lessen the visibility of any gaps.
 

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I have encountered this problem since I am normally installing builder grade cabinets .Most of the time the rails aren't perfectly flush with the stiles . Our solution has been to add a piece of small muliion style molding to hide the seam of the filler to the top of the cabinets . If the right molding is used it can make a nice accent piece .

I don't like to run screws through the tops of the rails to attach the fillers. When I have room I use pocket screws . When I don't have room I use trim head screws and putty the holes .

I like the idea of rabbiting the fillers as long as there is room . I may try that one in the future . A piece of mullion would be the easiest fix IMO .
 

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I have encountered this problem since I am normally installing builder grade cabinets .Most of the time the rails aren't perfectly flush with the stiles . Our solution has been to add a piece of small muliion style molding to hide the seam of the filler to the top of the cabinets . If the right molding is used it can make a nice accent piece .

I don't like to run screws through the tops of the rails to attach the fillers. When I have room I use pocket screws . When I don't have room I use trim head screws and putty the holes .

I like the idea of rabbiting the fillers as long as there is room . I may try that one in the future . A piece of mullion would be the easiest fix IMO .
Mullions are difficult to do with full or near full overlay doors
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It turned out the rabbet was a good excuse to upgrade from my hand-me-down routers. Geez! Should have done it years ago. A 1/16" reveal didn't look right, so I went with a bit more. I already forgot what it was, but maybe a shave more than 1/8". It was a better look over the door. I did it so as to leave room for some shims above to snug it down for the screws. Also, tacked it to the ceiling through the shims to lock it in plumb. It was a good solution overall.
 

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