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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am finishing up installing some kitchen cabinets and crown and ran into this issue. The cabinets have varying heights and most of them have varying depths so the crown on the lower height cabinets just return into the sidewall of the taller cabinets. But, on the end pantry cabinet, which is a lower height, the depth is the same as the taller cabinets and therefore is flush. One end of the crown just returns into the wall, but the other end will have to return back into the cabinet, which will make the door of the adjacent cabinet not open if I do a regular 45 degree outside return.

The cabinet designer messed up on this and should have adjusted this depth. Not a big deal, and I'm sure this is pretty common. Im just looking for the best way to return this without affecting the door too much.

Another poster posted this attached picture which I think will work without any issues from the client. I am just not sure how to make the miter cuts. Any thoughts? I cut all my crown miters using the fence and the measured bisected angles. I am thinking I would put this straight on the fence and turn my 45 degree and cut to get my bevel and then do the same for the return piece.

Hopefully there is a better way to do this though!
 

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I am finishing up installing some kitchen cabinets and crown and ran into this issue. The cabinets have varying heights and most of them have varying depths so the crown on the lower height cabinets just return into the sidewall of the taller cabinets. But, on the end pantry cabinet, which is a lower height, the depth is the same as the taller cabinets and therefore is flush. One end of the crown just returns into the wall, but the other end will have to return back into the cabinet, which will make the door of the adjacent cabinet not open if I do a regular 45 degree outside return.

The cabinet designer messed up on this and should have adjusted this depth. Not a big deal, and I'm sure this is pretty common. Im just looking for the best way to return this without affecting the door too much.

Another poster posted this attached picture which I think will work without any issues from the client. I am just not sure how to make the miter cuts. Any thoughts? I cut all my crown miters using the fence and the measured bisected angles. I am thinking I would put this straight on the fence and turn my 45 degree and cut to get my bevel and then do the same for the return piece.

Hopefully there is a better way to do this though!
I dont like the look of that. i would have just ended it short and done a 45 return .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I dont like the look of that. i would have just ended it short and done a 45 return .
I don't really like it either, but by ending it short to return it, then there would be a gap in there that would probably look worse. The good thing here is that it is not in a place where it is going to be seen easily and most likely the buyer will not even notice it or think twice about it.
 

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What about pulling the pantry forward with some blocking (and a tall filler to hide it) to create the additional depth needed to be able to do a proper return? I loathe codged returns like that shown.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What about pulling the pantry forward with some blocking (and a tall filler to hide it) to create the additional depth needed to be able to do a proper return? I loathe codged returns like that shown.
By pulling it forward and doing a proper return, I would still be hitting the doors. It would need to be trimmed from the backside and pushed back in 2.5".

Actually as I am thinking about it....there is a 3" filler between the two cabinets. They are already installed, but I might be able to splice a small piece on top of the filler (blocking), cut the crown short and return it into the filler. I think that will work and also be the simplest!

I am still up for ideas if that doesn't work.
 

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I will be honest and say I don't know exactly what you mean, but I will throw my opinion out anyway. :)

The pic looks horrible, IMHO. I do the normal 45* return and put a small piece of filler in to hide the gap created by the return. But again, I might be off base.
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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I've done this with a return like this and a filler behind the return.

This kind of 45º return with 22.5º miters keeps the crown back away from the door and allows the door to open beyond 90º

In the photo I had a different problem, and elected for a return that would just reach onto the drywall.
 

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What about blocking out the adjacent cabinet far enough to have the crown die into the side like rest of the cabinets in the kitchen?
 

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That is a strange looking return. But I guess it's better than some I've seen.

Just pulled out some crown where they cut the crown square and filled in the side with plastic wood that matched the color. Believe it or not, it took a moment to realize what had been done. It was rather inconspicuous. Actually, I'd have to say it looked better than the above pic, although it was technically cruder.

Filler and a normal return backed away to clear the door is what I typically do, but being adaptable doesn't hurt.

-TH
 

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And in the second pic, why do the 22.5 thing, instead of a clean 90* return into the drywall? It doesn't look bad, but did you do the same thing on both sides to make it consistent?

Either way, that is way better looking than that first return, in my opinion...

-TH
 
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