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hurtlocker
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I am wondering how to handle raising kids in construction.
They are still small but in a few years I am going to have to decide wether or not I want them involved.
My concern is If I get them involved right away, and show them everything I can. They will Have a good grasp on construction by the time they are 18, but they may be less likely to venture out on their own, and do something they are passionate about.
On the other hand I keep them sheltered from construction.
They go to college, and get a job.
They start to hate their job, and want to get Into construction
Now they are 25, and new to construction, and way behind
Is there a happy medium?
Anyone have experience raising kids or being raised in construction?
Would you have done it diffrently now?
Happy new year:party:
 

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I dont have kids but why not try bringing them out on the jobsite occasionally? You should be able to tell if the enjoy being there or not. As you can trust them with more dangerous things allow them to cut something that isnt important and get them more involved. Be their source of summer employment.

I worked for my uncle in summers and weekend throughout H.S. I also worked summers and weekends in college until I found myself in class thinking about work and how to do something better and quicker. Then once I started to wish I was on the jobsite when it was a nice day out, I knew what path I should take to make me happy.

They'll figure it out. I did and all I needed was a little help from my parents on not making too many dumb life decisions and when I did, letting me deal with the consequences.
 

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I agree with Bambamm, I took my girls with me when they were younger.Bad idea. Now they are 17 and will help me sometimes, when money is involved!
 

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Working
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I was raised in construction, am 3rd gen. My first job was humping shingles across the roof at 12 years old. This was actually punishment for screwing around in school, loved every minute of it. I use to ride my bike to the job site after work to help out if only for a couple hours Was very eager to learn and do what ever I could.

Was running a crew by 16, but by this time I THOUGHT I knew everything. Was a dick until 18 then went to collage for auto body. Worked part time in cunstruction for pops until 21 trying other jobs as I went. Was a in metal fab, welder, sign maker, landscaper, R/C car biz, auto body etc.... But always had the desire to do construction. From 21 to present I have been in construction full time and love it.

My brother on the other hand worked 2 summers when he was 17 and 18. Never wanted anything to do with construction. Refused to help most times more interested in computers.

Basically they will fallow what ever they want to do if it is construction or some thing else. Personally I would bring them there and see if they enjoy it or if the stand there texting all day.

Cole
 

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As you know, you can never have to many tools...educate them in every way possible. Bring them with you on the job, when it's time for collage, let them go if they want...Then they will have the tools to make their own decision...and they will also have knowledge in different fields and not have to depend on anyone else.
 

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Are you listening to them? Watching them? Do you stay aware of THEIR leanings, aptitudes, abilities and desires?

There is a whole wide world out there beyond construction. Can you keep your own feelings out of it enough to recognize perhaps a completely different direction in which they may desire to travel? These aren't just questions. This is a TOUGH thing to grasp and accept.

Our children are not OUR children. They are life's longing for itself merely brought forth through us. Their dreams are not our dreams. We can't go where they are going. Yes, they can come into our world, but we cannot enter theirs. It is theirs alone, and we need to stay sensitive to that.

Just a few thoughts to keep in mind.
 
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Every summer, since I was about 10 years old, I would spend working with my father on his construction projects. First few years mainly as a tool fetcher, (Hurry up!! I need that @#%%& screwdriver now!!) and slowly going to puttin on the toolbelt and measuring blocks and nailing boards. He seemed to teach me a lot of fundamentals early, which helped a lot, but I remember wanting to spend those summers hangin out with my friends and not sweatin it out on a construction site getting sworn at by my father. I actually remember being on jobs as early as 5 years old, but I dont think that I was much help back then. I have an 11 year old son now and I really haven't taken him with me very much because I figure that I'm gonna let him choose if he wants to go do construction instead of being forced to go like my dad did with me. Dont get me wrong, I love the construction trade, but I also wanted to be a kid and play instead of work as a kid. Oh yeah, I forgot to mention that today's my sons 11th birthday!:happybday:
 

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don't do anything. Pushing kids into things they don't want to do is BAD.
If their interested they'll show it and you can give them an opportunity.

I started collecting a paycheck at age 14, I thought it was great. I was making "bank" and always had money while my friends were asking mom and dad for an allowance. But as I got alittle older (18-19) I figured there was better things to do with myself and moved away from construction (or tried to, I should say). A few years later, not finding anything better to do, or anything that really interested me. Well..... your either into it or not. Or just killing time.
 

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I think that most of us that are resourceful, (those that can figure out problems that are not "out of the book"), can attribute this skill to having many different experiences throughout our lives.

If your kids can spend some time in the field, they will benefit regardless of what career they choose. The logic behind decisions in remodeling, the approach to estimating, planning, deadlines, commitment to your promises, dealing with customers, unreasonable requests from code enforcement etc. etc., can only help your kids to become better and more valuable in whatever they choose to do.

There has to be some aspect of your day to day responsibilities that should interest your kids. Take time to show them all the hats you wear, and let them try them all on.
 

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Parents have shown their young how to do things since the beginning of time, how is this even a question?

Like many here, i feel you can never educate a youth too much, the more they know the better they can make an informed descion later in their life, but it's upto us to make sure we pass along as much information as we can so when the time comes in their life, they can handle it- intelligently.

I have my 8yr old girl with me every chance i get, she gets made fun of for being a "tom boy" because she likes to play outside, does'nt worry about getting dirty and is authoritive (sees dad barking orders and she has my personality...sadly LOL) but i have no problems teaching her as much as i can, and i pray she uses all of this knowledge and goes to school for a worthwhile profession, because by and large, this crap is a dead end job:laughing: Think of all the rich/successful "carpenters" you know........
 

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I would show them what it's all about and give them the option to get in the family business, but don't stress it on them. My dad always tried to push me to get in the family business, he owns a restaurant, but I decided to stick with what I like, which is construction.
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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I raised three boys while be a GC. Always thought I would have at least one interested in the trades but that didn't play out.

They were all exposed in many ways and even got hired for a few things by me. Fired the youngest one day when he was eight. Fired the oldest and his friend off a straw bale house job for sucking beyond belief. He was 15. Those were some fun times.:laughing:

What I did not understand at the time is that they did not need nor want to learn my trade. It was my secret little dream to have a son tagging along and striving to be a younger version of me. Looking back I wish I was a little wiser through all of that.

The pure gem that was being planted and cultivated out of my view was that they all were learning what a good work ethic looks like. They all have come to me and my wife and thanked us for teaching them how to work and be responsible and how they can notice how much better equipped they are than their piers at handling responsibility.

So even though in the moment there seemed to be little knowledge being passed on, the seeds were planted in fertile soil. We are very proud of them and have very few regrets about the way they were raised. I can't think of better result.
 

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My 6 year old would love nothing more than to go to work with me every day. I can give her a hammer and let her back nails out of wall bracing and shes happy for hours. My older daughter likes to play with the router and a Pantograph stencil tracing jig when I let her.
As long as you teach them how to work safe and keep a close eye on them its a rewarding experience for everybody.
 

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Home Builders/Contractors
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Teach them all you can while you have the chance.

My father used to drop a dictionary on my chest every night before bed and make me pick a word, spell it, and use it in a sentence before I could go to sleep. People would ask him "Joe, why do you do that"?"

His reply..."because I dont want me kid waking up dumber than he was before he went to bed."

True story. BTW, he was an Albany NY Firemen.

I learned the trades from my uncles. Electrician and Master Plumber. Both were also builders. I owe my success to all of them.

However, I still cant spell, but I can build one hell of a house.

Good luck man...
 

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Teach them all you can while you have the chance.

My father used to drop a dictionary on my chest every night before bed and make me pick a word, spell it, and use it in a sentence before I could go to sleep. People would ask him "Joe, why do you do that"?"

His reply..."because I dont want me kid waking up dumber than he was before he went to bed."

True story. BTW, he was an Albany NY Firemen.

I learned the trades from my uncles. Electrician and Master Plumber. Both were also builders. I owe my success to all of them.

However, I still cant spell, but I can build one hell of a house.

Good luck man...
Good thing he wasn't a carpenter, he might have dropped a hammer on your head at night.:laughing:
 

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Absolutely have them on the job and train them.
They will decide what they will want to do for a living regardless.
But the knowledge they gain from the time on the job site will stay with them forever. As such they will always be able to:
A) Make a living using their skills.
B) Use the skills when times are tough.
C) Use the skills to make some extra cash when needed.
D) Save tons of money when they own a home themselves.

Not to mention the quality of time you will get to spend with your kids. That alone is something that most parens would kill for.
 

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Stud
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When I was a kid my father brought me to jobsites quite a bit. He did driveways & lawns. I would ride my bike around these new neighborhoods having a ball. As I got older I started working usually pushing a wheelbarrow. I liked it because I was getting paid.

I really started liking construction when my father started buying bigger equipment. It took me a long time to figure why he didn't let me operate when i was younger. He wanted me to see things from a laborers point of view.

What's funny is that he always encouraged me to go to college & get a job working more with my brain & less with my body. I went to business school & half way thru I knew I wouldn't like the type of jobs that my friends were getting. Transferred & got 2 year degree in construction technologies.

It's been 16 years since I got out of college & I can say that the most enjoyable part of my job is working for with my father. Working with family can be tough but it is well worth it. My father semi retired 2 years ago but still goes to jobsite regularly helping out when needed. I like being able to run different things by him.
Just the other day we were talking about where we saw the company in the future & I told him that I was thinking about a change. He agreed & reminded me that he had "told me so" a few years ago.:eek:


My advice to you would be to teach your kids everything you can if they are interested. If there not interested you can still show them how a good work ethic is needed in any line of work.:thumbsup:
 

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i was also raised in construction.not only masonry but in carpentry.my dad and uncle had a partnership,my uncle ran the carpentry crew.while dad did the masonry end.was always on the job getting into everybodys hair.mom had a cow the time she drove up and caught me on the roof at age 5.at 14 i was "working"all summer.got a check every week that 90% of went into savings.paid cash for my 1st pickup.at 16 i was working after school everyday.at 18 i was running our rock plant.at 21 was running the plant and our fireplace shop.at 26 got tired of the business and opened a resturant/bar,didnt work so went back into masonry.when my dad died i started my own company with the knowledge needed to operate it.
now my son is 13.i told him i would teach him how to lay brick,ect.....but i want him to go to college and not be in this business.since we live 20 miles apart,he only is able to come on the job when he is with me or i am doing work in his town.
my advice would be let them make up their own minds as to wiether they want to work the business or not.dont force them into anything,you will regret it.
 
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