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Go to Amazon and buy the book "Markup and Profit". While its on its way read through the business forums and take notes, or do like I do and copy and paste into Word documents.....

Handyman businesses need a steady supply of work to make much money. Try to learn as much as you can and work towards larger jobs. Get licensed, work hard and be honest.
 

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1. The higher your average sale the less time you have to spend on chasing work
2. Develop a price book for all common handyman repairs and continue to develop your pricing in advance of a potential customer calling
3. Know how to qualify customers to eliminate cheapskates and tire kickers from wasting your time
4. Develop some larger accounts to keep your cash flow going but don't rely too much in one customer in case things change
5. Learn how to sell for above average margins instead of giving your work away
6. List all sales objections and practice what you will say to overcome them before you ever hear a customer utter the predictable words will hear

Good luck
 

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I have customers ask me almost weekly if I know a handyman. Having a contact for a good handyman is handy. I don't have one. I would think a handyman would be popular at local networking groups. Realtors and other tradesmen like exterminators and plumbers often could use a contact like that when they are dealing with people. Locksmiths. Pool guys. I have people saved in my phone for various things and give numbers out.
 

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Even though some (even on this site) view the handyman as a scourge to "our" society, a good one is gold and I have only a couple on my roster that are worthy recommendations as a reputable general contractor. (Don't let my screen name fool you :laughing:)

Just be legitimate (insurance, any business licensing, proper accounting and tax paying, etc.)

Also never try to tackle something that you are not absolutely sure you know how to handle, or are not licensed for depending on the local laws, and back up your work.

Good luck with your new endeavor.:thumbsup:
 

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Hair Splitter
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18,335 Posts
1. Develop a price book for all common handyman repairs and continue to develop your pricing in advance of a potential customer calling
2. Know how to qualify customers to eliminate cheapskates and tire kickers from wasting your time
3. List all sales objections and practice what you will say to overcome them before you ever hear a customer utter the predictable words will hear
4. Learn how to sell for above average margins instead of giving your work away
5. The higher your average sale the less time you have to spend on chasing work
6. Develop some larger accounts to keep your cash flow going but don't rely too much in one customer in case things change

Good luck
Great advice...just ranked in importance, IMO.
 

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Home Repairs
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291 Posts
Welcome to CT & congrats on the new business. The guys have offered some great advise. I'm pretty much a glorified handyman myself.

Ninety percent of my work come from realtors/management companies. I do some occasional drywall/texture work for builders.

Get state licensed so you don't have to limit yourself and end up turning down jobs that could otherwise be in your wheel house. Definately get L/L insurance.
 
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