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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I have a question for a project we're about to start. Usually, if we're doing a wainscot (1x rails and stiles, ply backing, and panel mould) that's chair rail height, we'll join the run on the bench and fasten it to the wall as one piece.

I've never done a floor to ceiling wainscot paneling and it would be unruly to fasten on the bench/floor then lift it into place. The run is 14' long with 8' ceilings. I was thinking about putting it on the wall stick by stick and using glue and pinch dogs to make a solid joint. Would biscuits/dominos be needed in this application? If so- how do you use biscuits if fitting between two walls?

Any help is appreciated.
 

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PCI
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Nooo, fit it all together, glue and nail.in place, then lift the wobbly panels into place and power nail with a Ramset to drive her home solid! Maybe a 3" nail just to see if there are live wires in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nooo, fit it all together, glue and nail.in place, then lift the wobbly panels into place and power nail with a Ramset to drive her home solid! Maybe a 3" nail just to see if there are live wires in there.
Thanks PCI, you’re the man!
 

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PCI
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Boom, boom ,boom, boom! One 1x in place, now 16" +or- whatever boom, boom, boom boom ! Next!
 

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Paint grade or stain?

For paint, you could split it into top and bottom (full length) then biscuit/ domino/ pocket screw the top piece to the bottom piece. I'm assuming there will be some sort of trim at the ceiling and floor (crown/ base) that would be sufficient to cover whatever gap you want to allow yourself to make life easier
 

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I'm guessing PCl was joking with you. I would put a level on the ceiling to check for dips, that could mess with the installation. I would also bevel the back side of the top rail and hope it's enough to overcome the mud buildup. if you're covering it all w/ an MDF, that will help in giving you a backing to help join the rails/stiles.

i've never used the pocket screw filler plugs, but this instance sound like it may help for joining smaller pre-made sections together. that is, built a 4' section x ceiling height section, lift it up, build another then fasten with surface mount pocket screws and install plugs. can't finish nail until pocket screws are in place, otherwise you can't get the clamps on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I ended up using PL premium on the backside of the rail, stiles, and 1/4 mdf panel.

A lot of wood glue (titebond II) and pinch dogs at joints for clamping pressure. You can see the pinch dogs in the second image. These worked great. I didn't use any traditional joinery, so I'll let you know how the joints fair over time. They should be okay glued and clamped (pinch dogged). Everything was nailed to framing where possible, PL'd and nailed at opposing angles where nailing to framing wasn't possible.

The door casing is glued + pocket screwed from the backside and I used a 3/8" bead scribed and mitered instead of an extension jamb.

Per PCI's request, I made sure to use plenty of ramsets and hit every live wire possible. BOom boom done.

Pics:


 

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PCI
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Nice work, I like it! It gives me a great idea for a project I just looked at.
 

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Sorry I missed this thread until now. It looks great.

Just wanted to throw out something I use to make sure the stiles and rails stay in plane (no lippage) even if the walls are uneven. This only works when your panel molding will cover the edges of the rails and stiles.

I route a 5/32 biscuit slot in the top and bottom edges of the rails as well as the short edges of the stiles. Rails are secured to the wall. Biscuits and glue go in the slots everywhere a stile meets a rail. They add some tensile strength but mostly they keep edges in plane.

Panel molding covers the slots.

I also prefer the pocket screw method, but agree it’s not always practical.
 
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