Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,883 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have any experience, good or bad, with the Job Site snap panel roller? I am looking at one that will do a 12 inch snap panel...as I see the market for metal replacement roofs growing.
 

·
Been around
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
12 is a pretty small panel. That has a 1" standing seam I imagine?

You are looking at a used machine?

What size coil does a 12" snap panel start with?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,883 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think the total height is 1-1/2, with a concealed nail fin. 2 stiffener ribs. Probably starts with a 16 inch coil. The 16 wide panel oil cans too much, IMO. The advantage of doing this, with a trim brake that will do high tensile steel on site, is doing it all on site. The coils can weigh a few thousand pounds I guess....but.....what a neat way to do a roof. Consolidated bid, and if you miss a piece of trim, you are not traveling a 100 miles for more.
 

·
Been around
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
OK I looked it up.

Is it the 12/16? It can do both 12 and 16 if so.

So if you can handle the coils, that's a start.

Having a brake that does 24g or 26g is another step.

Having a means of slitting the coil to the size you need for the trim pieces is pretty major as well. You start looking at 100' of valley, 100 feet of ridge cap (so 200' of 'z'), 200 feet of edge trim (drip, rake, whatever profile you prefer) and another 100 feet of walls to flash (another 100' of 'z'), I can tell you for certain you won't be happy doing this with a pair of tin snips.


I don't agree about the oil canning. A 24g, 16" panel holds up pretty well. 26g not as well. 26g is not as forgiving when handling and the standing seams may stretch more easily. This can be one thing that leads to oil canning.

The Jobsite brochure does not list any mid-panel relief features like striations or additional ribs which could help reduce potential oil canning. The snap lock assembly is, however, a fairly rigid bend on its own. This will help minimize panel deflection over small roof irregularities.

I run a New Tech machine. I have 1-1/2" snap lock and 1" mechanical tooling. I use 20" coil. All the material I use on a roof comes to me as coil or flat stock (48x120). It's great to have the capability, but it's also quite a commitment to fabricate and install. I would rather just do the shop work and run the panels.

So to support this I have a steel brake, a gang slitter, a jump shear and a portable roll former on a trailer (just the rollformer on the trailer). I also have a SkyTrak to handle the coils, but I had that before. A standard forklift would suffice.


12" panel fro 16" stock means it takes 133% of the finished size to achieve that coverage. 16" panel from 20" stock mean it takes 125% of the finished size.

Say you have a 30 sq roof.

12" means you need 4000sq feet of coil

16" means you need 3750sq feet of coil

250sq feet of coil in added cost for the one 30sq roof.

For every 3 pieces of 16" panel you install, you will cut, prep and install an additional one piece with a 12" panel. On a typical 5sq section, say 30' L x 16' rafter you would install an extra 7 panels. On the 30 square roof, that's an extra 42 panels. That's significant.

To me, the 12" panel is too small and a little too 'busy'. It helps that the $$ support my position, but my opinion came before any thought of cost.

When I run 1" mechanical seam, I get about 17.2" per panel coverage. So it's about 117% coil to coverage. But the mechanical seam is more involved than a snap lock and costs more to install.

I think the ICF business is a really great place to be and I appreciate your input to the forum.

I have read a lot of your posts and you seem like a thoughtful guy. So I hope I have given you some food for thought :thumbsup:
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top