Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have been filling up equipment from a transfer tank in one of our trucks. This has worked fine but looking for a better way.

Looking for ideas on a portable tank that we can leave at the site and have our fuel supplier go and fill up as needed. This tank would need to be moved in at the start of the project and moved out at the end.

The advantages of this are:
We do not need the truck with the transfer tank at the job site everyday to fuel up machines.
We do not have to go to shop with truck with transfer tank to fill up that tank and then go to job site and fill machines.

The disadvantages:
Cost and regulations for storing fuel on site. And moving tank down the road to and from the site.

I don't have any idea on the cost, or what is available to store around 300 to 500 gallons. I have no idea what the regulations are.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

·
Stud
Joined
·
605 Posts
I wouldn't set up a tank at a job site due to liability and osha requirements. On bigger jobs, we have our fuel supplier come by the job site every other day to fill us up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What are the OSHA rules? does any one know?

The supplier coming in to fill is a good idea, we did use a complete tank full in some cases on certain machines (the dozer comes to mind) in one day. I just don't know if my supplier would be willing to be on call every day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
what we use.
That's perfect, I like the heavy frame around it. I was talking to one my friends today about this and he uses something like you use but welds a plate steel containment box around to catch any leaks.

I think that's what I am moving towards, thank you Day I knew you would have something!

The more I look at yours the more I like it. That would be around a $1000 to build. I think steel square stock under it so pallet forks can pick it up would be good also. Just in case we want to move it with a skid steer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
The one like day has is what we've got at our shop and will the transfer tanks on the trucks with. Most of the pipe crews around here have them and supplier just comes to the site and fills them. Just need to give them a key to the lock. I think most of them are double walled so no need for something to catch spills, it's built into the tank. If the outside gets punctured the lining is still good. I guess unless someone really screws up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The one like day has is what we've got at our shop and will the transfer tanks on the trucks with. Most of the pipe crews around here have them and supplier just comes to the site and fills them. Just need to give them a key to the lock. I think most of them are double walled so no need for something to catch spills, it's built into the tank. If the outside gets punctured the lining is still good. I guess unless someone really screws up.
We have the tank at the shop also but not easily moved like Days. We have been doing the same thing as you, fill transfer tanks in the trucks from that.

Day is yours double walled? Is that part of the OSHA regulations?
I would want to protect from spills anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
We have the tank at the shop also but not easily moved like Days. We have been doing the same thing as you, fill transfer tanks in the trucks from that.

Day is yours double walled? Is that part of the OSHA regulations?
I would want to protect from spills anyway.
Luckily our shop is a pretty easy stop. Sounds like you have some pretty big machines that eat fuel? We can usually top off ours at the beginning or end of the day with the transfer tanks. Most of our foremans trucks have one along with our mechanic.

I've also seen the tanks set inside of a big galv. Cattle troff? Have to be pretty careful not to bend them though. Might save the time and $ of fabbing one though.
 

·
Stud
Joined
·
605 Posts
I don't think Day's tank would be up to OSHA regs but I may be wrong. I think you have to have a roof on it and it has to be in a self contained unit in case it leaks.

We have 2 tanks at the yard and each one is in the bottom half of a septic tank. I've seen a few on bigger jobs and they have had roofs and also in 1/2 a septic tank. The particular company I saw follows every OSHA to a tee.

If you're using a enough fuel you should be able to get a local fuel supplier to stop at your job.
 

·
Stud
Joined
·
605 Posts
I always thought that 95 gallons was about the max legally you could move before it becomes a pain. That's why I always heard it was tougher to get transfer tank over 100 gallons. Could be urban legend or it could be just in Mass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,250 Posts
that's why that tank is portable, with no company nomeclature on it. it sits, locked up, clear on other side of jobsite. when needed, take loader/excavator over to tank and fill it up. we always timed deliveries so when moved from jobsite to jobsite, it was totally empty, stuck in the box of a dump truck. they couldn't see it, they didn't bother us. but this is south dakota too. i really don't see their logic. a 95 gallon fire, burns JUST as hot as a 550 gallon fire, just not as long.
 

·
Contractor
Joined
·
7,672 Posts
Here is a link to the OSHA Rules regarding flammable liquids...

https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=10673

Good luck figuring it all out.

I don't use enough fuel to justify an onsite tank, I do have fuel delivered to my shop and transfer it to small truck mounted tanks. My fuel supplier provided the tank.

JMAC, I would talk it over with your supplier and see what options they can offer, they'll know the regulations.
 

·
Stud
Joined
·
605 Posts
that's why that tank is portable, with no company nomeclature on it. it sits, locked up, clear on other side of jobsite. when needed, take loader/excavator over to tank and fill it up. we always timed deliveries so when moved from jobsite to jobsite, it was totally empty, stuck in the box of a dump truck. they couldn't see it, they didn't bother us. but this is south dakota too. i really don't see their logic. a 95 gallon fire, burns JUST as hot as a 550 gallon fire, just not as long.
At the end of the day it depends on what someone is comfortable with, where they live and how tough local restrictions are. We used to have a 275 gallon version of your tank that would fit in the back of a one ton and be set at job.

Here is an example of why I won't do it that anymore. Bought a brand new pickup this year put in a brand new transfer tank with pump. Forgot to get sticker from fire dept. right away. One of my guys got pulled over & gets $1500 in fines most of which is from no tank sticker. Go get the $25 sticker & luckily get fines waived. Like I was really trying to avoid paying $25. It's not worth the risk of fines around me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
I went and looked at my friends two units that he had sitting at his shop. One was 500 gallon and one 250 gallon. Both had a 3/8" thick plate steel box welded to the bottom of the tank with a drain plug in the bottom for water to be drained out if needed.

Both tanks had lots of "flammable" and "diesel" stickers on them. They also had DC pumps. Both looked to be exactly what I am looking for.

He has his supplier fill them when they get to the job site and make sure to empty them before they get transported back to the shop. Both can be moved with any forks or chain.

In my travels today went by a road work site that had exactly what I am talking about on the side of the road for every one to see and this tank had the local fuel suppliers name on. So they could be supplying tanks to fill at job sites.

As far as OSHA, and DOT is concerned I don't think they would apply if the tank is moved empty. The tank has the proper vents etc.

The one you have to worry about is DEC. This is why I think spill protection is a must.

He can have his guys go to job site and fill equipment as needed with out having a company truck on site that day.

That idea is what got me thinking about my own. In some cases I have employees drive their own vehicle to job site to work instead of driving my company truck. We work out of a site trailer so my company vehicle is not always needed except for moving in and out, or pulling trailer, picking up material etc. This saves on me paying for the drive time, fuel, later start times etc. The last project we were on site for three months. Fuel was always a problem, machine is empty, transfer tank on truck is empty etc.

So other option is make sure that every truck has a transfer tank and a company truck is always present. Either driven there by me or an employee, in some case the commute could be close to an hour.

Not completely sold, but have not seen a real down side. yet
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top