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outforablast
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93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys I been trying to get back into conversation with some of you by posting some things from time to time maybe this will strike a conversation
On my jobs I normally decide howl long it will take to tear down the machine I'm working on
Then to blast it to near white and throw in a few hours just in case I was wrong also adding in hours I feel we will need to beat and hand tool clean areas so we can blast better
Then I will add my hours for cleaning my steel after blast by power washing it with hold blast made by chlorid out of New York
Then I will add up masking labor and materials then add up painting labor and materials
Last I will add time to assemble and detail
Adding 10% on all materials

Now my question is going back on a job I done to figure profit and sq ft pricing just for reference kinda a bit tricky but I record all my labor materials and see where I'm at then Keep files on the specific job with photos so I have reference on future jobs

How about you guys
Ps I can not seem to figure a solid sq ft price keeping in mind I know there are going to be variables it's more not knowing how to measure sq ft on crazy structures having angles pockets and braces I know it's normally L x W but I feel on some that's not a proper guesstamation on material needed I normally wing it by experience but it does bite me in the @## sometimes
 

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Bob
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512 Posts
I wish I was that organized! When people ask me how much I say I'll tell you when I'm done! Or if I really don't want to do the job I'll show them my pay bucket and tell 'em every time I point at the bucket to throw another $100 bill in . . .
 

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outforablast
Joined
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93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Lol I would prob get slapped for that bucket truck but I kinda like your humor

I always stick to my quote no matter if it cost me thousands of dollars I honor my word and just let the customer know I was way off not to expect the same price next time

I know time is money but my objective is to get the quotation down to a science so I have leverage and quick wins on jobs

In my history I have lost maybe 15 jobs meaning I did not make the profit I should have but I gained the experience to know better next trip
 

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Trial and Error Opperator
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2,018 Posts
Lil d

I do about the same
I keep track of material, time and hours etc
Done it for years now, BUT even a ballpark average sometimes don't come close

I thought I had the sqft on buildings and on different types of surface down packed for a while then I hit one that looked straight forward
It was a night mare...

Same with dump trucks, I do so many that I could quote with my eyes shut, but then it hit me
On one job that the company had put a rubber coating on it before paint ( from the factory) doubled my time

I tell every customer now that I can give the best Ballpark that I can, I still use some of my reference to my other jobs to help me price, but one added step to my estimates is that it is not a fixed price it sony a estimate !
I inform the customer that when I get to the job, and start blasting, usually within a hour Or less I can tell how the job will blast and if I see any reason that it will take longer.
If I feel it's going to go over I stop and have a meeting ( phone call or in person) to see how they want to proceed.

It's worked ok
And most customers are very impressed that I'm so up front with them.

If it works out that they don't want to spend extra on a job that I figured wrong, then I pack up and charge them for the time spent on the job
 

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Kelly
Joined
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257 Posts
I try to make at least $120 an hour profit if I can't do that why bother maybe I'm high priced. You never know how tough it will be to get off what your blasting. Yesterday I blasted a 58 corvette it had about 4 paint jobs on it we counted 6 layers. The toughest stuff was the red oxide primer and 2k in the big flat areas where they were able to hit it hard with a sander and the primer really stuck to it. Funny how you can tell where the paint stuck the best as you blast it off.
 

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Registered
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117 Posts
Nice work. I particularly like the storage tower, what an improvement.

Pricing.

There is not substitute for experience when setting a price.

The biggest problem for me is that the work is so diverse you need hundreds of years of experience to cover all bases, That is one of the reasons I find this forum so helpful, the experience does not necessarily have to be mine.

First and foremost I never price blind. I allocate a job number and create a file for every single enquiry win or lose, then, I visit every single job big or small because environmental issues affect price almost as much as actually doing the task. I go armed with a camera and take more shots than I care to count always being sure to get something I know the size of into some of the shots to get a meaningful scale. From this I am able to plan the job, check access points, parking requirements, plant requirement and storage, security, commute time and so forth. All this information is stored in the work file never to be deleted as experience has taught me that many jobs do not happen at the first enquiry and when revisited by customers you need to recall the details as most customers expect you to have total recall.

From the work file I plan the logistics of the job in order to make an attempt to accurately price the job. I have tried the following whatever price I quote I stand by win or lose.

1. My starting point is to work out a day rate that I would like to achieve. This is a flat rate that I think is achievable in the location. Sometimes it is possible to sell days as opposed to being task specific.

2. I have a spread sheet with hire charges for each piece of equipment even if I own it. I work out what plant, including the towing vehicle, I need to carry out the work. Make a charge for consumables, media, fuel for plant and vehicle, accommodation, travel time. add this to the wage of the operatives plus an admin charge to cover the office multiply by projected time then multiple this by a profit percentage.

3. I ask the customer what his budget is. More people than you would think tell you this. I then reverse engineer the price and see if there is any money in it.

At the end of the job I fill in a spread sheet of all costs deduct this from the quoted price and then either smile or cry.

I never lose sight of the fact I am in the business of making money a consequence of which is that I have to blast not the other way round!!
I have no desire to be a busy fool. I sell service, professionalism, health, safety, reputation above price. Anyone can sell ten dollars for five but do they make money.
 
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