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We are starting to get quite a few people interested in Japanese baths, anybody have any info on these other than the toilet has to be far away from the shower/tub.
Thanks
 

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The only thing I recall about them is the small, deep tub with scalding hot water. Apparently everyone uses the same water, so you shower first. Your gonads shrink up when you get in and if you move in the water it gets worse. It is quite refreshing. Don't see a lot of use of it during the summer months however.
 

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Japanese baths are totally different than American baths. Japanese take a bath every night before they sleep. The shower and bathtub of the majority of Japanese bathrooms (probably 99%) are in the same room but are separated. The shower is on the outside of the bathtub.



The bath tub is not for cleaning. It is for warming up the body and relaxation.

Before entering the bathtub, washing the body is the rule. Shampooing of the hair can be after or before entering the tub. Why is washing before entering the tub important you might ask? It is because each member of the family uses the same water. The water is changed only once each day. The purpose of the bath is to relax and warm the body, NOT to wash. It is not proper to bring the face cloth or any other towel into the bathtub. Since everyone uses the same water, keeping the water clean is expected.
In traditional Japanese homes there is a decided order for bath taking. Usually the Father takes his bath first, if he comes home late then this order will obviously be different. In most homes the last person to enter take a bath is responsible for draining the water and wiping down the tub. However, in some homes the tub water is used the next day for laundry. A hose is use to siphon the water into the washing machine. Why not, the water is clean. If you have the opportunity to be a guest in a Japanese home, at some point you will be politely asked to take a bath. Don't refuse the offer. You may want to be kind and let someone else go first, but this innocent gesture of kindness could create an awkward situation. :sad:

A lot of modern baths here in the states have a shower and a tub/whirlpool. The "bath house" is a small oasis... shower, tub, sitting area. The toilet and sink area is tougher. Some want the toilet in a little room with a small wash sink and another area with the sink and dressing area. Some just want a knee wall hiding the toilet.

Takes a lot of space for one of these deals. As you can imagine, careful planning with the HO is needed.

Dave
 

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The one I was in wasn't much more than 24x24 and deep. I think it had a seat in it. The one in the photo looks like a western bathtub.
 

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The one I was in wasn't much more than 24x24 and deep. I think it had a seat in it. The one in the photo looks like a western bathtub.
I agree that it is a western style (and an ugly one with tile on the face)... many, many shapes exist depending on year, budget, and preferance.

My believe is the HO will have a definate idea what is desired and the trick will be filling their order!
 

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Totally off topic but I remember the old soap commercial with all of the little kids lined up in the loooong tub and washing each other's backs.

Then one kid passed gas. Very funny ad.
 

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I'm fine with showering. If I need to relax I'll buy a hot tub.

Oh and I don't care how clean you are, if you try to wash my clothes in water that has contacted someone else's bunghole I don't want no part of it!
 

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I lived in Japan for 4 years and I can tell you this about the baths, I could not wait to get back to the States to take a good bath........
There bath houses were rather nice, especially for a young teenage boy seeing how they only had some lattice work and some foliage separating the men side from the women s side:clap::clap::whistling
 

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There bath houses were rather nice, especially for a young teenage boy seeing how they only had some lattice work and some foliage separating the men side from the women s side

And this is the reason you wanted to get back to the states where solid walls separate the sexes? :eek: Maybe your bathwater over there was TOO hot! :laughing:
 

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Japanese tubs (ofuro) are generally designed differently- tall with a small opening generally- built so you can get your entire body in without having your knees sticking out. The shape is also better for retaining heat.

They traditionally were made of wood- Wood is somewhat better as an insulator than stone. Easier to make, too.

A friend built a Japanese style bath- he ran hydronic heating through the floor. And a concrete ofuro- with hydronic heating through it. Pretty nice touch I thought.

There are a number of Ofuro makers here in the states. Most build them from Port Orford Cedar or something close.
 

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Toilet doesn't have to meet the ADA standard...:whistling
I actually had a customer request for an Asian style toilet, and one of the lines in the brochure claimed it was a "natural way' to actually use the toilet....maintain good health, etc. Now.....if you have arthritis, how is that possible?

I did note they have models that can be mounted on a platform for more of a "western" style.

The customer ended up with a Toto instead. :thumbsup:
 

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I am working with a Japanese couple to put in a Japanese style bath in their basement (along with the rest of the basement finish). A quick summary of their requirements:

~ Three rooms: 1. Half bath 2. Dressing area (separated by sliding doors from the other two 3. Deep soaking tub (exactly like the ones above) and open shower.

~ One sink in room 1, one sink in room 2. Toilet in room 1.

~ Each room needs to be separated

Apparently it is part of the culture for a family to bathe (sp?) and shower together, however, the toilet is unclean and should be far away.

Kind of a cool project since most bathrooms these days are basically the same.
 

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I am working with a Japanese couple to put in a Japanese style bath in their basement (along with the rest of the basement finish). A quick summary of their requirements:

~ Three rooms: 1. Half bath 2. Dressing area (separated by sliding doors from the other two 3. Deep soaking tub (exactly like the ones above) and open shower.

~ One sink in room 1, one sink in room 2. Toilet in room 1.

~ Each room needs to be separated

Apparently it is part of the culture for a family to bathe (sp?) and shower together, however, the toilet is unclean and should be far away.

Kind of a cool project since most bathrooms these days are basically the same.
Sounds like a fun project. Make sure you get some pics before, during and after. :thumbsup:
 

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I am doing some research to build my own Japanese bath (they call it a "unit bath system") in the US too. Namely, they have this ready-to-assemble bathroom which comes with lighting, exhaust fan, tub, tilings, and all (and you can customize what to add, too!). What sucks, however, is that they only sell this sort of product domestically, and not globally. C'mon TOTO :(

Here are some pictures of unit bath systems.

509835
509836
 
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