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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New construction. Hot water side goes to left and then capped. If continued left would stick out into the middle of bedroom wall. Is this for some sort of application? Am I missing something?

ForumRunner_20140408_141252.jpg

First pic from left side angle. Next are from door of shower then back of shower wall. Shower head leaked causing dry rot.
 

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Probably was short a 90 but had a stub, a T and a cap...Or it's a stub for future use.
 

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Looks like a shortcut to me. My plumber has me put a 2x4 nailer block in the wall directly behind the shower valve and he attaches it to that. Looks like he ran the lines long to support it.
 

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i see nothing else holding it in place....so he did that instead of a bracket...looks like a sloppy job

it would fail inspection in my area
it needs to be supported solidly....it needs to be screwed to a 2x4....not held in place by holes in the studs
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i see nothing else holding it in place....so he did that instead of a bracket...looks like a sloppy job

it would fail inspection in my area
it needs to be supported solidly....it needs to be screwed to a 2x4....not held in place by holes in the studs
No wood behind it when I opened the wall. When I rebuild wall this week wood will be behind it.

Just seems silly to add two extra connections and possible screw threw that area too. Notice no metal plates to protect the pipe.
 

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i see nothing else holding it in place....so he did that instead of a bracket...looks like a sloppy job

it would fail inspection in my area
it needs to be supported solidly....it needs to be screwed to a 2x4....not held in place by holes in the studs
The craftsmanship is sloppy, no doubt about that, and it's missing several nail plates, but there isn't anything wrong with using the existing framing to support a shower/tub valve.

I would have thrown in another stud for support if I had installed it.
 

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what keeps it from twisting forward and backward?

it would not pass any inspector in my area

if it moved freely its a poor install...it should be rock solid

i noticed the nail plates missing also....cant believe a pro installed it that way....
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The craftsmanship is sloppy, no doubt about that, and it's missing several nail plates, but there isn't anything wrong with using the existing framing to support a shower/tub valve.

I would have thrown in another stud for support if I had installed it.
Existing ? It was brand new construction. That's the part I don't get why drill three studs to the left. Solder two extra joints and no nail plates to protect. It like they were hoping the drywall guy would punch the line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I had the outfit that made the resin walls and floor come in to see if possible to just repair the wall. (Damage was under pan so it all had to come out) but the field guy told me when I also said the square part of the valve cover was not sealed with anything. He said oh they don't seal them either because more water would go behind thru where the 2 screws that hold the cover on then the top of a flat square cover meets the shower wall. Then said besides you don't want to seal the lower part so the water can get back out.

I said gosh I guess I'm just silly since I put silicone on the top and two side to prevent water from going in behind it. And around the collar the the center of the valve. Cuz I am from the school of thought that less then an ounce of sealant my prevent a $10,000 repair cure.

I stopped listening to what he had to say. And really did want to know anymore the further I dug into their work. Plywood strip sitting on the concrete of the liner put in with drywall screws punching thru the shower pan liner below the curb level. Nothing to prevent water from going down the back of the surface of the onto the drywall and hitting the plywood strip and out of the top of the liner. Liner not over the curb and up the wall in curb corners. More and more but you get the idea at this point.

ForumRunner_20140413_150433.jpg
Curb liner hacked in corner

ForumRunner_20140413_150522.jpg
100% of the mud pan was soaking wet still after leak was fixed for 3ware and no shower use for last of 3weeks.

ForumRunner_20140413_150643.jpg
Mud slope removed liner soaked on top and under neith. Preslope 100% soaked all the way around. This is furthest corner from shower head leak. Keep in mind shower head did most of the trouble.
 

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Existing ? It was brand new construction. That's the part I don't get why drill three studs to the left. Solder two extra joints and no nail plates to protect. It like they were hoping the drywall guy would punch the line.
Drilling the holes is a much quicker installation and allows you to slide the valve to the left or right to find the true center mark w/out having to be nuts on during the preliminary installation.

A lot of times Plumbers are working from a bid or are facing pressure from the GC to just get it done and signed off, particularly when it comes to Spec or Tract homes. Like I said previously, using the existing framing to support the valve is a very common practice.

I would have run the line to the shower head in copper which would have locked the valve in and prevented it from moving forwards or backwards. Using PEX for tub spout drops and or shower risers isn't recommended by most manufacturers -- Particularly in tub/shower applications. A lot of times the smaller diameter of PEX (which is usually the same diameter as the diverter port) will force the water to divert to the shower port and bypass the tub spout port altogether.

I don't know what to tell you about the missing nail plates -- Although it has been my experience that some drywallers and tilesetters will remove nail plates if they feel it is quicker to remove them than it is to plumb up the wall.

A lot of times I will take a portable planer and recess my nail plates on high-end jobs where the budgets aren't as thin as they are on Spec or Tract homes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Drilling the holes is a much quicker installation and allows you to slide the valve to the left or right to find the true center mark w/out having to be nuts on during the preliminary installation.

A lot of times Plumbers are working from a bid or are facing pressure from the GC to just get it done and signed off, particularly when it comes to Spec or Tract homes. Like I said previously, using the existing framing to support the valve is a very common practice.

I would have run the line to the shower head in copper which would have locked the valve in and prevented it from moving forwards or backwards. Using PEX for tub spout drops and or shower risers isn't recommended by most manufacturers -- Particularly in tub/shower applications. A lot of times the smaller diameter of PEX (which is usually the same diameter as the diverter port) will force the water to divert to the shower port and bypass the tub spout port altogether.

I don't know what to tell you about the missing nail plates -- Although it has been my experience that some drywallers and tilesetters will remove nail plates if they feel it is quicker to remove them than it is to plumb up the wall.

A lot of times I will take a portable planer and recess my nail plates on high-end jobs where the budgets aren't as thin as they are on Spec or Tract homes.
Good to know on the smaller dia pushing back to tub spout.

Yeah I don't know any of the circumstances during build. Not a tract house though. It was a "tour of dream homes" it's an annual program to showcase some of the larger high end homes in the area. And get people fired up to build one like it. Or for realtors to sell them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Here is the main reason for the damage. The nipple from the shower head to the elbow. Notice barely two threads used on one side. The other side (left) looks like more threads were used but look closer and you'll notice half of that is a shadow from the picture flash. Neither side was seated well.

When I was searching for the issue discovered from show head area from reaching in near shower valve. I thought oh loose shower head. Could NOT tighten it at all. So I removed it to find it was like this.
 

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