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I was at a DD that is a couple years old that I hadnt been to yet. I was looking at the large head joints when I notice the clothesline hanging out. Is it common to flash under those? I dont do many, but just put a piece of lead on top and put the weepers on the bottom as normal.

 

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Renaissance Man
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Technically, a pan with drip edge and end dams. Not so sure the rope needs to be so pronounced.

Old schoolers would generally through wall flash and cut the sheet short of the brick face, no downturn, no ropes.

Then again, you probably know this.
 

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This is a classic example of the way NOT to align wood framing above a masonry base. We kind of covered it in a recent post. Again,Steve Mouzon depicts the proper method in his book Traditional Construction Patterns. We as a Nation have seen it improperly done this way for so long we have grown to accept it as "normal". It is a recipe for trouble not to mention it looks clumsy and awkward.
 

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I think as this is common practice for a brick veneer window sill, architects assume it has the same effect in these instances?
In reference to the clothes line/weep rope over time it rots.
Even in this day and time on post we still use the rope, usually the specs/details call for min. 4" wick to lay horizontally along the flashing. Usually we cut nice and flush so they don't look like fuses.
 

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I know absolutely nothing about the rope you guys are always talking about so I have no comment there. My code is that IF it isn't a single piece cap, then the cap needs to be installed with a wash or with flashing underneath. Except for on century homes I've NEVER seen it done, but I think I'm going to start. I see open heads on fairly new sills all the time. no idea why they open up and crack as much as they do but it's disheartening
 

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mason contractors
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Fred the only other way would be to build out the frame base water table ie curve it outward but it wouldnt match the style.
The flashing is good there as it's where the sill brick me the frame just like a window sill. I never left the rope in....we always turn them and pull out later. I use the aluminum spacers [for gutters nail hngers] over and over again ...of course they sell them too with screens but they are too fine. imo cut thin copper or aluminum shavings and insert.
 

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Without seeing the actual as built detail, I would say the weep belongs in the head joint above the flashing, not the bed joint below it.
 

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Renaissance Man
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Here's an old school pan - done in the late 40's...heavy galvanized sheet stock left shy of the face. No weeps or ropes.

...vs, modern day practice.
 

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Leaving the rope/wick in is the best practice.
That is removing them leaves a very direct path for insect infiltration. Unless you live in states with no ants, roaches and so on you are inviting these pests direct route behind your work. And in termite prone areas I would strongly recommend leaving your wick in.
Also in the south we have a insect known as mud daubers their practice is filling round holes with larvae and packing caught insects with layers of mud repeatedly. That's why tube and removing weep rope is frowned on. Once the hole is packed no water is able to weep.
 

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About the weep rope, I've always left it in. I have one GC who doesn't like the rope, and just wants me to leave the head joint out.

The inspector here in my county wants to leave the rope in, so the HO doesn't come back later and caulk the weep hole.
 

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Rope no rope,weeps vents flashing etc. etc. That is only the tip of the iceberg.The crux of the issue is the whole thing is detailed incorrectly. As I mentioned previously this is NOT the proper way to align wood framing above masonry. If I knew how to post pictures,I would post the correct method. As previously stated,it is and has been done this way for so long that the proper way is a distant memory.
 

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Here's an old school pan - done in the late 40's...heavy galvanized sheet stock left shy of the face. No weeps or ropes.

...vs, modern day practice.
I do the extended hem on lintels and shelfs and still use weeps.....otherwise you rely on seep rather than weep.
Rope left in is merely wicking moisture rather than weeping it...reminds me of an Indian Guy whom would literally piss in clorox jugs,slit their tops and insert torn flannel cloth strips [wicks] into the fluid,... letting some hang out....it would wick out a scent to keep deer away.
In the bottom however he poked little holes for WEEPS to fertilize the plants!:whistling
 

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Rope no rope,weeps vents flashing etc. etc. That is only the tip of the iceberg.The crux of the issue is the whole thing is detailed incorrectly. As I mentioned previously this is NOT the proper way to align wood framing above masonry. If I knew how to post pictures,I would post the correct method. As previously stated,it is and has been done this way for so long that the proper way is a distant memory.
The travesty of which you consider so near and dear to your being. Might just be more justifiable on an Architectural Forum? As we are the doers not the instructors.:thumbup:
 

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The travesty of which you consider so near and dear to your being. Might just be more justifiable on an Architectural Forum? As we are the doers not the instructors.:thumbup:


That may be true. However,if the designers and architects are clueless on how to properly detail such things where will they get enlightened if not by the doers ?
 

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I see open heads on fairly new sills all the time. no idea why they open up and crack as much as they do but it's disheartening


If the open sills you mention are on cut stone (especially limestone) is because as the sill stock is cut,the stone is slightly polished. That slightly polished edge will not allow mortar to bond to it and in short order it falls out. To overcome that problem,"scuff up " the ends of the stone with either a grinder or bush hammer,the mortar will then stick. Also,limestone needs to be washed to get the mill dust off it.
 

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That may be true. However,if the designers and architects are clueless on how to properly detail such things where will they get enlightened if not by the doers ?
It's obvious to me that you haven't done much enlightening. When you can bring an architect that pulls up on the job in a vehicle that costs more than we make in 5 years. Also never worn work boots and hates to wear a hard hat because his salon cut may get disturbed. Has an ego that wouldn't fit in the state of Vermont and a college education in architecture and a pedigree a football field long. Please let me know when the enlightenment begins I'd be ecstatic to watch the result.:laughing::mad:
 
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