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I am the General Contractor on a project to remodel, repair and make livable a house that is 105 years old.The roof has 3 layers of shingles over cedar shake and 1x6 boards. About 25% of the 1x6's have to be replaced.
The cedar just crumbles when removed. The owner of the house asked me if I can just cut the 1x6's with the 3 layers and cedar roofing left attached to the 1x6's. He says he wants prevent the big mess he believes the crumbling cedar will make when torn off. Then we will replace the 1x6's with plywood on the entire roof. I need a roofer's input.
 

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Butcher of wood and metal
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You are still going to have a certain amount of mess doing it that way. Plus I am not sure you will save all that much time. Three layers, know what that does to saw blades? Let alone cutting through the ceder and 1 x 's. I would tarp it good or build a temp dam at the bottom edge of the roof to catch the stuff.
 

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I've tried to remove roofing like that in the past. My partner convinced me it would be easier and quicker. Wrong! We went through a lot of blades and we still had a mess to clean up. That was the first and last time we did that. Scrape it like you normally would and use tarps.
 

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Ive used that idea many times when the whole deck is to be replaced. Give it a shot. Sometimes it works but sometimes it dont. Just install some boards as you go to walk on and keep the rafters/trusses straight and spaced properly.

If you have an idea that you think will work embrace it and give it a shot.

I cut all roofs with over 2-layers every 10 feet or so. Average roof for me is 22 sq. Only use one blade . Huge time saver and less mess
 

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tell the homeowner that he isnt cleaning it up so what difference does it make. Homeowners kill me with their input. I had a lady complain one day that we were banging on her roof too much. ??? I was like " Its 2 pm on a wednesday! Go to work and you wont hear it!"
 

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No way to avoid the mess, period. All those crumbly cedar shingles and composition shingle pieces are going inside and on the ground unless you invent a grinder vac that just grinds it and sucks it up at the same time.
 

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i usually cut the hips and ridges on any roof with cedar underneath, but that's it. I only cut them so we don't have to dig down to to start ripping. It eats blades, but not that bad. Don't stand behind the saw!
 

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That's not crazy at all. It is resourceful.

However, it may or may not prove to be more efficient. Therefore it isn't something you keep doing just because you started that way.

Three asphalt and a cedar? I doubt a 7 1/4" circular saw would make it all the way through the 1x6. If it does and the saw guy was worth a chit, it is possible that you could save a lot of clean up and tear off time.

Look at it this way:

You exchange the labor of removing hundreds of nails from the multiple layers of roofing for the labor of just 2 nails at every 1x6 rafter intersection. So if you could run the saw from ridge to drip, between say every other rafter, followed by a cross cut every 3 - 4 feet, you could remove the entire three layers and skipped sheathing quite easily. The roofing and skipped sheathing can come off in nice clean 'pads'. You need to incorporate a tool like a shingle eater to make this work.

The real challenge here is knowing whether or not the whole process is saving time and money or not. This answer will not be the same on every job.

As far as saw blades are concerned you will burn through three or four on 20 squares if the saw guy has a feel for it. If he doesn't, you could burn through twenty. Not all blades are equal. Some spit teeth just looking at them. Others will go for quite a while. You can ruin them very quickly with too much force. Also they can bind if the weather is too warm. Best to try it out early in the day before the roof heats up. Keep the saw running straight with only enough push to cut.. If you hit a nail with only a little push you can avoid ruining the blade. If you are horsing it through, the blade will be worthless in no time.

I don't care to convince anyone whether or not this process is worth it or not. I do suggest to anyone to consider giving it a try and deciding for themselves.

I wouldn't count on the rafters being too consistent so far as 16" on center or whatever. But you might get lucky.

If you decide to try it, for blades try 18 tooth framers ....Marathon or Dewalt. Don't use 24 tooth, they will not work as well. The real cheapo blades are a no go, the welds on the teeth are just too poor.
 

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No way I'd do that... I can almost guarantee the rafters are 2x4 and probably a few are cracked already.. Those boards are important to the structure of the roof...

If you take off the skip sheeting, you'll have a bouncy uneven mess

Get a potato fork, and turn the handle 90deg so when you hold it the tines are vertical. Makes it easier to run sideways on the roof between the skip sheeting boards.

Run your new sheeting right over the 1x6's and youll have a solid, flat roof deck.:thumbsup:
 

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MrLatone, you are not seeing the one factor that will make this unfeasible. After cutting through about six feet of those layers the saw is going to be so gummed up it won't move. Doesn't matter the temp outside, the friction from the saw melts the asphalt and packs into the blade chamber.

I love it when people try to think more efficiently but I know this will happen from experience. If anyone is going to try this, make sure it is with a saw you don't care about because it won't be worth a damn after you are done.
 
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