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I'm trying to get a close estimate for the amount of shoe I need. I've heard of a formula before, but I forget the percent. I forgot to measure for it when I was at the house. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't know, someone told me a few years ago and it worked for the floor I was doing but it could have just been a coincidence.
 

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Take 1k sq ft and figure how many different perimeter dimensions there could be. Take in to account miters instead of square corners.

IMO, go back and measure unless close enough is good enough...:whistling
 

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The best formula is (X-p)+5%
X= amount of base in house
p= perimeter of rooms covered flooring that doesn't need base shoe.



:whistling:whistling
 

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Take a measuring wheel and run around the house... that is the best and quickest formula I can recommend because I was never short :thumbsup:
 

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I buy shoe in bundles of twelve, sometimes 3-4 bundles at a time. I've never worried about running out... It's shoe, only expensive when you need six feet and need to drive to go get it.

My lumber yard is never more than twenty minutes from me but it always takes nearly an hour to go grab something.

Buy way more than you think you need. Return the rest or save it for the next time
 

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Paul
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A formula that has always worked for estimating purposes (used only for my own supply estimates, actual used will vary and we bill what we actually use) is square footage divided by 3.5. Adjust up or down depending on how open or cut up the layout is. Example 1000sf area to install = 285lf of base/shoe/cove base. If it's wide open I'll drop 50ft off or add if its cut up. Through the years I can count on one hand the number of times I had to bring more the next day or run out to get a job finished. More times than not it's a tad heavy.
 

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You have to measure no matter what you do... just measure the room length + width x 2 divided by lengths of sticks you're using equals how much you need...

Example... 11 x 13 room

11 + 13 = 26 x 2 (four sides, adjust if more) = 52lf divided by 12ft sticks means you need at least 5 sticks to cover the room...

No general need to account for overages as the doors, closets, openings and archways provide the overage in the measurement...

If you have an overhead floorplan, it's even easier... either way, we are talking minutes to do it...

Best of luck... 8^)
 

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Paul
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A formula that has always worked for estimating purposes (used only for my own supply estimates, actual used will vary and we bill what we actually use) is square footage divided by 3.5. Adjust up or down depending on how open or cut up the layout is. Example 1000sf area to install = 285lf of base/shoe/cove base. If it's wide open I'll drop 50ft off or add if its cut up. Through the years I can count on one hand the number of times I had to bring more the next day or run out to get a job finished. More times than not it's a tad heavy.
Case in point - today's job. 585sf flooring, 220lf shoe. Master suite with dual walk-ins and a guest bedroom with typical 2-6x8 closet. 585/3.5=167+50=217. 14 sticks of 16' = 224. Dead on the money. Works majority of the time. When I walk a job a can get a feel of how much to add or subtract from the original formula.
 

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Case in point - today's job. 585sf flooring, 220lf shoe. Master suite with dual walk-ins and a guest bedroom with typical 2-6x8 closet. 585/3.5=167+50=217. 14 sticks of 16' = 224. Dead on the money. Works majority of the time. When I walk a job a can get a feel of how much to add or subtract from the original formula.
3.5 formula wouldn't have worked on the house we're working on... when you add variables like hallways and closets, it would've been off by 13%... and that's assuming no screw-ups...

But if it works for ya'... :thumbsup:
 

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Here's my formula: i measure how much i need.

30-35% of footage? We did a 2900' a few weeks ago, needed 440' of shoe... 30-35% wouldn't have even been close
Probably had alot of baseboard heat..

It works as a general rule for quick figuring..as mentioned you get a feel when less or more needed. I'm sure if you calculated room dimensions you would the percentage make sense;)
 

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The difference between 30-35% could make for a sucky day... :whistling
Not really.. figuring and actually buying are 2 different things..this works in estimating..when doing the job you can give an accurate count for purchase.Unless alot of baseboard,archway,doorways etc the count works pretty well.
 

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topsail's trimcat
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i dont have the slightest clue how its possible for their to be a formula as to how much shoe you need.. you can have a small 1800 sq ft house but its chopped up into a bunch of small rooms which means requiring a ton of shoe.. or you can have a large house that is open concept.. because of that you wont need as much. thats why floor sq footage means nothing.. i measure up how much i need and add 10%
 

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Paul
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i dont have the slightest clue how its possible for their to be a formula as to how much shoe you need.. you can have a small 1800 sq ft house but its chopped up into a bunch of small rooms which means requiring a ton of shoe.. or you can have a large house that is open concept.. because of that you wont need as much. thats why floor sq footage means nothing.. i measure up how much i need and add 10%
Because as I mentioned, you get a feel for how much to add or subtract based on how open or cut up it is. It's called experience :thumbsup: We're talking in context of estimating purposes, like as in "do I need to throw another bundle on the truck or am I good" - "nah we have a thousand footer tomorrow and Wednesday, it's not cut up at all a bundle and a half should get it (our bundles are 256lf ). We're not saying the formula will get you dead nuts for billing purposes but you'd be surprised how accurate you can be and not have to run around the house measuring or doing a takeoff. If it don't work for you don't use it. I've been using this method for over 10 years, like I said it's cost me maybe 3-4 trips to get more shoe out of thousands of jobs - I'd say that's a pretty good success rate.
 
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Dang PrecisionFloors, I just used your formula for baseboard for a basement finish project I'm on and it's dead nuts on, probably within just a couple feet.
 
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