Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I'm a painter for about five years now, doing mostly interior residential painting. Inhaling paint fume, of course, as picking up a brush/roller or getting paint on one's clothes, is part of the profession; but health-wise it could be something harmful in the long run that has been overlooked and should be looked out for. Inhaling any kind of chemical fume for eight hours a day is a bit too much and not good, I think, and eventually it's one's brain/mind that will take the likely unfavorable consequence..

I wonder what do you, the veterans and the professionals, think? Do you wear mask (e.g. 3M gray-colored mask for latex fume) or respirator (o.v for harmful alkyd fume) daily? Or do you wear/use other equipments/products? (if so, I'd very much appreciate any info and thanks in advance) Or do you just simply not care or even not smell the fume? :D
 

·
Deck Designer/Builder
Joined
·
2,430 Posts
I'd say to ask Bob, but it's probably too late for him - LOL ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,858 Posts
If you ever read some of AA Paint's 'conspiracy' posts all your questions would be answered. Run, - - run from them fumes and don't look back!! :cheesygri
 

·
Pro Painter
Joined
·
2,314 Posts
If people around here had half a brain, you'd get a decent response to your questions. No point taking any advice from someone that let's Bill O'reilly do all their thinking for them. :rolleyes:

I have been painting over 6 years and use a respirator only when ventilation is bad. Usually if I'm inside painting, we open windows, bring our own fan, then grin and bear it...However, with a lot of solvent based products in a closed in environment it's respirator city, and always when spraying.

The only thing you can do is try to limit your exposure. Always try to wear rubber gloves when dealing with oils and solvents. The risk is MUCH higher when handling solvents with your bare hands than it is breathing them, IMHO. Dipping your hands in mineral spirits can have some serious consequences like liver and kidney damage! Yikes.

Be careful out there. Read and know the MSDS sheets for all of the products you require your guys to use or carry. They should probably have some of these available in their vans if you have employees. Solvents are not something to take lightly....

I've seen and heard of latex paints ruining painting careers for some people due to over-exposure some people will actually develop latex sensitivity, and some people are allready that way. That's why your doctor has "latex free" rubber gloves!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
39 Posts
I've heard that smelling laquer all day is why a lot of painters become alcoholics...not sure why that might be but there seems to be a lot of alcoholism/drug use in the trade.
R
 

·
Deck Designer/Builder
Joined
·
2,430 Posts
AAPaint said:
If people around here had half a brain, you'd get a decent response to your questions. No point taking any advice from someone that let's Bill O'reilly do all their thinking for them. :rolleyes:
I'm not sure if this comment was directed at me or not but if it was, I'd like to respond as follows:

There's no need to throw insults around. My light-hearted comment was meant to be a joke. I'm not a painter by trade but I have more than my fair share. It just seemed a little bit of a silly question coming from someone who says they have been paiting professionally for 5 years. I mean, of course there will be long term effects from smelling paint fumes on a daily basis. I can see asking about types of prevention but asking the way he did just caused me to make a small joke - not an offensive one.

So, if your above comment was directed at me, I would appreciate an apology. If it wasn't directed at me, then maybe you should apologize to whoever you directed it at.

Note: I didn't mean to hijack this thread, I just had to respond.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Glasshousebltr said:
Ah.........waht wsa question agin?:cheesygri

Bob
Hi Bob,

No kidding, that is how my mind tends to react and speak sometimes at the end of some day double-coating walls and trim in a one windowed/windowless room (basement). :) At such time, the mind (at least mine) seems to react more slowly to the surroundings, thoughts speaking in a rather incoherent way, scattered and slow.., and if I were to reply your question, it'd be: "wich quesion?" :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks much for the informative and thorough input from AA Paint. One could always learn a thing or two from others' viewpoints, not necessarily that there's always something new that one does not know, but, as a reminder, something which one already knew yet overlooked..

Hi Terry (from DecksEtc.). I didn't know how to put my question in a more rational, sensible form, hence at first glance it is kind of, admittedly, a silly question. Your saying that, there will be of course long term effects -presumably harmful- from smelling paint fume, is kind of the answer I'd like to know, but that is only half of it. For what we, the painters and the paint companies, know of the paint fume at the present time could be as little as we did of the lead-based paint decades ago. And maybe five, ten, twenty years from now, after researching and studying, they will conclude that even latex paint fume is detrimental and thereby will replace certain existing harmful ingredients in the paint with newer, safer ones. But by then a generation has gotten the consequences.

Thus it seems the only remaining 'unnecessary' questions are: how serious these long-term effects would be? Are they pernament? Are they irreversible? Could they be something that could pass down to one's offsprings? Perhaps no one knows hitherto, no one asks, no one cares.. And one might say: so what? Look around you, people still continue to smoke cigarettes and to drink alcohols despite the deadly known consequences.. We all eventually die anyway!

But it'd still be beneficial for one to positively know the harmful effects of something, so one would take precautions and does not risk one's health unnecessarily.

Am I imagining things? :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,858 Posts
ProWallGuy said:
Decks, it was obvious to me that AA's post was directed at our resident right-winger, (and occasional pot-stirrer :cheesygri ), Tom R.
Hey, now, - - it absolutely COULDN'T have been directed at me, - - AA promised himself to 'ignore' me, - - and since when did I get DEMOTED to 'occasional'?? :cheesygri
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,858 Posts
DecksEtc said:
So, if your above comment was directed at me, I would appreciate an apology. If it wasn't directed at me, then maybe you should apologize to whoever you directed it at.
Decks,

It was definitely directed at me, - - but no need for him to apologize, - - I already know how 'sorry' he is!! :cheesygri

Just kiddin' there, AA, - - lighten up a little, will ya?? ;)
 

·
Painting Contractor
Joined
·
1,881 Posts
Use low or zero VOC paints when you can. Most companies have them.
VOC free paints have other harmful ingredients research them
to find out what they are and which paints have them.
When you have to use certain paints, ventilation and mask
is very important. Don't wash your hands with paint thinner or even
those citrus cleansers (I am not sure I trust them). A product being
natural is not necessarily harmless.
Avoid using stain primers, try removing the stain instead.
Suggest to customers not to paint as often things requiring solvent
paints.(enamels new popcorn ceilings etc.)
Most of the time common sense rules the day.

http://www.safecoatpaint.com/

I never used their paints but I will give them a try soon.
 

·
Custom Builder
Joined
·
4,406 Posts
ProWallGuy said:
I do the same as AA said. Check for good ventilation, if none, wear a respirator.

If you hear a guy laughing for no reason, and his face is real red, get him outside, pronto! :cheesygri
They'd be dragging me out on the hour.:cheesygri

Bob
 

·
Custom Builder
Joined
·
4,406 Posts
Long term? My a$$. I'm just fine and I was spraying all the way through the 80s and 90s. Just look at all my kids. Ok....my leg shakes about a little, but it's not so bad. The twitch? oh hell that aint nuttin and whats a few teeth, they all aint gone.....sorta.

Ya know.....I really don't remember the convulsions anyhow.:cheesygri

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
painter77 said:
Hi all. I'm a painter for about five years now, doing mostly interior residential painting. Inhaling paint fume, of course, as picking up a brush/roller or getting paint on one's clothes, is part of the profession; but health-wise it could be something harmful in the long run that has been overlooked and should be looked out for. Inhaling any kind of chemical fume for eight hours a day is a bit too much and not good, I think, and eventually it's one's brain/mind that will take the likely unfavorable consequence..

I wonder what do you, the veterans and the professionals, think? Do you wear mask (e.g. 3M gray-colored mask for latex fume) or respirator (o.v for harmful alkyd fume) daily? Or do you wear/use other equipments/products? (if so, I'd very much appreciate any info and thanks in advance) Or do you just simply not care or even not smell the fume? :D
panit fumes help the day go by faster if not atleast at a much more enjoyable pace...j/k.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
painter77 said:
Hi all. I'm a painter for about five years now, doing mostly interior residential painting. Inhaling paint fume, of course, as picking up a brush/roller or getting paint on one's clothes, is part of the profession; but health-wise it could be something harmful in the long run that has been overlooked and should be looked out for. Inhaling any kind of chemical fume for eight hours a day is a bit too much and not good, I think, and eventually it's one's brain/mind that will take the likely unfavorable consequence..

I wonder what do you, the veterans and the professionals, think? Do you wear mask (e.g. 3M gray-colored mask for latex fume) or respirator (o.v for harmful alkyd fume) daily? Or do you wear/use other equipments/products? (if so, I'd very much appreciate any info and thanks in advance) Or do you just simply not care or even not smell the fume? :D


Why don't you use a mask that filters out dust and latex paint smell ?. I buy this in Canada for about $4.99. It will last 2-3 jobs and throw it away. Better be safe than sorry.

3 weeks ago I was wearing a respirator mask with old dirty filters. Very stupid. I ended up with a serious chest infection and a charge of $50 for mediation. It took 2 weeks to heal. Don't take the risk...wear a mask, store it in a safe place away from dust, clean it with rubbing alcohol, and throw out the cartridge / mask when you start smelling paint. I made a serious mistake!!

Zeebo
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top