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Good morning, I work in Maryland and we have quite a large hispanic population. I speak, read and write fluently in Spanish and was wondering if other people in the trades thought starting a translating/interpreting business related solely to the trades would be a viable business? Although I still like picking up my tools most days I also realize that it's not something I want to do forever. Any thoughts?
 

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California would be another good state to try that in. Me, I'll not do business with someone even advertising such a UN-American idea.
 

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So......... Your going to help them ? Assist in taking American jobs, lowballing to the extreme, not pay taxes, help them read foodstamp-welfare forms (they are probably in mexican anyway).

Too bad you were'nt born 150 years ago. You could be selling guns to the indians.
 

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Although im definitely with the crowd Speak English or Get the FVCK OUT!

Lets just play devils advocate with this.....

On a job site you are going to be a "middle man" between the boss and the worker. Boss talks to you u talk to the worker....why wouldnt I just hire you? Saves alot of wasted time.

I dont see how you would actually sell a contractor on your services.
 

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...and the employer tells you something, you relay the message, the Mexican screws it up and you get the blame. Sounds like a job I'd love to have.:rolleyes:

I got a better idea.

How about you report whomever is hiring illegals and get them deported and then there is more work for the guys that are earning a HONEST living? Just a suggestion, mind you...
 

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The suggestion about a translating/interpretation business is good but will be hard to sell in the contracting businesses, There is really a big difference between a tranlator and an interpreter. A translator will usually only tell you what is written or said, while an interpretor will tell you what is really meant. As an example I had Russian translator tell me that a "concrete block plant" was a beton(concrete - that was obvious), black (block), flower(plant). An interpreter would have told you what was meant.

If you are only able to speak and understand only one language you are in the minority and at a disadvantage.

If you are an employer that hires bodies and cannot tell them what to do, you are really a dreamer and cannot expect anything to happen no matter how loud you yell. They may get a few words, but will not be able to really understand what you mean. If you cannot communicate, you have no business hiring someone.

Very often, people with only passing a introduction to language will understand only few words that perk up their ears as an alarm or alert. I am in that group when I have traveled internationally (Europe, China) and pick out a few words and a little more knowledge would really be a benefit. Now, I just pretend I do not understand and then listen and hope to pick up more (like a hunter hiding in the weeds). It does wonders but do not let them see your eyes, which is the give-away. Some are also smart enough to plead ignorance to the language.

In many countries, 2 languages are very common and frequently more, especially in Europe (3 or 4). Some countries are exceptions, like India that has 17 different languages in the country with Hindi being the "official" language and "English" (not American) being the business language. When 2 Indians cannot understand each other, the resort to English which is common everywhere since the Brits put the pieces to form a country. That is one of the reasons for telephone help systems (technical services-mainly high school kids operating and telemarketing/reservations) in India since the world is really very small and they are more flexible and better educated (the U.S. is 15th in education).
 
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