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The Duke
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This is the second weird one of the week. Installing a kitchen this morning and start looking for studs. I initially thought I hit a screw head. I'm guessing it is plaster over a cement board. House is at least from the 60's. This stuff is 3/4" thick. I don't see wire or lath at all.
 

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Umm, you've never seen that? Very common in southern New England for that era. The boards are usually 12"x96". Very dense. Then skimmed over.
 

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Every now and then poster
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I have seen that stuff around here too. We had one that the clients teanagers got in a fight in the back room, one kid threw the other into the wall and a 2x3 chunk of that stuff fell off the other side of the wall and knocked over their flat screen tv..

The guy made his kids mow grass to pay him back for my bill..

One thing is for sure its going to suck installing that kitchen. I'd lay out my wall cabs in pencil on the wall then pre drill all the screw holes..
 

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General Contractor
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This is the second weird one of the week. Installing a kitchen this morning and start looking for studs. I initially thought I hit a screw head. I'm guessing it is plaster over a cement board. House is at least from the 60's. This stuff is 3/4" thick. I don't see wire or lath at all.
I had that on a few remodeling jobs... instead of wood lath they use Gypsum lath and plaster on top, also in most cases if you taking the whole wall down, you will find metal ceiling and floor runner.

I have also seen a perforated Gypsum Lath, which had holes punched about 3-4" on center to make a mechanical key for plaster... They sure had ways of doing things.
 

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Umm, you've never seen that? Very common in southern New England for that era. The boards are usually 12"x96". Very dense. Then skimmed over.
I've seen on one occasion 24" wide by 12' in length, they would interlock with ship and lap joints... installers must of loved that stuff. Now everyone is screaming for lightweight rock.
 

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Was doing a stucco patch around a window that was improperly installed once and found that the exterior sheathing was gypsum wall board. Chipping away the stucco without breaking the "sheathing" was difficult to say the least. I love finding new materials in interesting places!
 

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Ugh I hate that stuff. That's what my personal house has and it sucked to remodel. All of my door jambs had to be extended 3/4" and let's just say rewiring the whole house was a nightmare.

Also I had a fun time hanging all my towel bars and such in the bathroom.
 

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Kent Whitten said:
Most people around here just put in paneling. You need to understand that the mindset of most Mainahs is "get it done as cheap as possible". Except for the coast and some cities, much of Maine doesn't have that much money to spend.
Same here, this is the second house I'm remodeling from 1900's and both got paneling... First one was the whole house, this one just upstairs bathroom, and they went right over the windows. Lol
 

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Just did a kitchen with these walls,had to cut around most of the perimeter for the new elec.runs.Cut was easy,but dusty with a diamond blade in a grinder.
Exposed most of the studs,the rest were already marked out from initial cabinet install,60 years ago.

Found metal lathe in corners,fortunately we were able to add to existing soffits rather than tear out,cause they were loaded with metal.
No cracks anywhere in these walls.
 

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It was Called "Rock Lath" in the upper midwest. Took the place of a plaster base coat and wood lath. Transitional material/methodology between plaster and drywall.... mid 60's was about the time that stuff disappeared from use.
 

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Rocklath is the brand we see here, stuff is all over Ottawa...and many installers liked to put a layer of expanded metal ontop of it then a scratch and brown coat of plaster followed by a finish coat...total wall thickness is about 1-1/4"
 

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bathroom guru
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Texas Wax said:
It was Called "Rock Lath" in the upper midwest. Took the place of a plaster base coat and wood lath. Transitional material/methodology between plaster and drywall.... mid 60's was about the time that stuff disappeared from use.
Exactly!! The precursor to today's drywall. Ripped out tons of it in my area.
 

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Seems like I'm running into rock lath more and more lately. I usually only see metal lath in corners but had one about a year ago that had metal lath between the rock lath and plaster topcoat.
 

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Seems like I'm running into rock lath more and more lately. I usually only see metal lath in corners but had one about a year ago that had metal lath between the rock lath and plaster topcoat.
That's really common here...It murderers any blade.
 

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Inner10 said:
That's really common here...It murderers any blade.
If I am only removing a section I will use my fein with a carbide blade and cut through the plaster to the Sheetrock. Cuts clean, less dust, and the blades last a long long time.
 

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GC, Finish Carpenter
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We have lots of it around Kitchener Waterloo ON in older homes. Some builders stuck with it longer because they felt it was better quality then the drywall but eventually everyone switched over during the building boom in the 80's (so I hear from the old boys).

I'm sure the gypsum board is behind that plaster but got smashed out by the electrician to run that (assuming) under cabinet lighting wire.

Use a small masonry drill bit to help look for the studs because they go through the plaster but not wood. Do this behind where the cabinets are going and measure you 16" from there. Maybe check a few to be sure. Some stud finders will work on thicker stuff but I don't trust them without checking with a drill bit because it can feel like the screw grabbed but it's just in the plaster. You will probably have true 2x4s too so they are a bit easier to find. It is usually 7/8" to 1 1/4" thick so you may need bigger screws.
 

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Its pretty common around here on 50's- 60's ranchers, but it is usually a thin coat of plaster, no more than 1/4", sometimes 1/2".
 
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