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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been a handyman for about three years. I have never worked with an actual painter, but I have done around 200 paint jobs. Mostly all residential repaints. I'm slowly figuring things out.

I am trying to determine what role (if any) spray painting should have in my business. I have a Graco Magnum HVLP setup. By the time I get everything in the room masked off, I could have rolled the walls three times. It makes a fine mist of paint that goes EVERYWHERE. Despite my best masking, paint still ends up in the wrong places. Do you actually use this type of setup for a repaint in a room with carpet? Or just in new construction?

I also recently acquired a little 6 gallon air compressor, so I was thinking about experimenting with a siphon or gravity feed sprayer. I ought to be able to lay down a smooth finish on a door or a metal baseboard radiator. Ideally, I'd like to spray all the trim. Not sure if I have enough CFM's. Do CFM's even matter if I am just going to paint a door?

Am I going about this the wrong way or do I just need to get my skills together with the HVLP?
 

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I own an air compressor (Ingersol-Rand oil-less!) and a Binks 2001 spray gun, 2 quart paint pot. I use it only when spraying solvent based paint on wrought iron, metal security doors, etc. I don't spray latex thru it. Latex is much heavier bodied and requires thinning in order to be sprayed. This reduces just about everything good...coverage, color, finished film thickness...

I don't own an HVLP setup, but would prefer that (for trim) instead of an air compressor for spraying latex. A small airless is what you need. Forget trying to do walls with an HVLP or compressor setup.

About masking things off taking too long? It just about equals out (vs. rolling) when you consider how much faster everything goes.
 

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Become a master at masking! "tight-tape" anything that is next to anything that gets directly sprayed. Overspray travels well, so "cover" (not tight-tape) anything such as furniture, windows, etc. As for carpet....I lay drops, leaving about a 4-8" perimeter uncovered. Then, use masking paper to mask under the baseboard(or on top of it if it's not getting sprayed) and overlaps drops. Just tuck the edge of the tape under the baseboard. Works gloriously. I do this on every paint job, whether rolling/brushing, or spraying. Go for a small, yet powerful airless sprayer for an all purpose sprayer. Graco 395 or Titan 440 are both great. I have a Spraytech 419. Same thing. Unless you're doing new construction, you really shouldn't be spraying walls. That would be a masking nightmare. Your sequence of painting needs to work in your favor also. If I'm painting walls, trim, and lids: I would paint the lids first, then spray trim/doors, then cut/roll walls. That way, you don't have to protect the walls from overspray. Lids are either sprayed and backrolled or cut/rolled. Just depends. When spraying lids, cover EVERYTHING. I spray trim whenever possible because it looks pristine and smooth. I only spray walls in new construction because there's no flooring, no furnishings, etc. Then do touch-ups after everything else is completed(flooring, appliances, cabinets, etc.)
 

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Maybe I'm wrong (happened once back in the 80's) but I don't think you have an HVLP, the magnum is an airless, big difference. Some really good advice in the above post. Overspray can also be controlled to a point with a whip hose, tip size, and technique. As far as masking go to SW and look at a Hand Masker 3000. One of the best investments I ever made. Also make painters plastic your friend and have plenty of drops. And if you ever do walls back rolling is a must. This is because spraying does to good a job. When you spray you get a really smooth finish, but if they ever need touched up if you don't spray the touch up on you get stipple from the roller or brush marks and on a smooth wall they will really stand out. If you back roll you have added that stipple effect.
As I said on another post go to an appliance store and get some big cardboard boxes. Then go to depot or lowes and get some mis tinted paint really cheap, then practice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Awesome. Great tips. That's exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! :thumbsup:

Yes, my sprayer is an airless. I was a little confused. I think my sprayer should get the job done, but internally it is made cheaply and won't stand up to heavy usage. So it is probably good for me to learn with.

What about spraying primer on new gypsum? Does that have to be back-rolled or just the top coat?

What tip do you recommend for doing the trim?

What about masking the carpet? Last time I tried taping it with blue tape. The force of the sprayer somehow lifted it right up and they got their carpet painted yellow! :eek:
 

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Awesome. Great tips. That's exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! :thumbsup:

Yes, my sprayer is an airless. I was a little confused. I think my sprayer should get the job done, but internally it is made cheaply and won't stand up to heavy usage. So it is probably good for me to learn with.

What about spraying primer on new gypsum? Does that have to be back-rolled or just the top coat?

What tip do you recommend for doing the trim?

What about masking the carpet? Last time I tried taping it with blue tape. The force of the sprayer somehow lifted it right up and they got their carpet painted yellow! :eek:
Backroll primer too. For masking carpet, that's why I tuck it under baseboard. I like a FineFinish tip for trim. 210, 312, 412, or 414.
 

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What I do for the carpet is I put my drop up close to the base, then I have a slat from an old vertical blind I slide under the base. Then I mask using paper not plastic on top of the slat. The slat gives me a 7' run before I need to move it. The paper is heavier than plastic so it won't blow so much.
For the trim and doors I totally agree with the fine finish tips.
As for your sprayer I started with the Magnum 9 and I must say it served me quite well then when could I upgraded to a larger sprayer. But I still have the magnum and use it on small jobs. The secret is cleaning and taking care of it.
One thing on taping the carpet I use regular masking tape 2020 from SW. It sticks better and you don't need the release feature for carpet.
 

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I'm old school and work solo, the only spraying I do is in my shop with a hvlp turbine. IMO airless sprayers are good for new construction (where production is the key word) when used for primers,trim and walls if there is no concern about over spray.

In real life very few times will come when you have an complete repaint where you can demolish the house with enough tape,plastic,drop sheets and paper to justify spraying. More likely it will be a couple of rooms that have more $ in furniture then you will make in a month. It all depends on what type of work you are doing. Hone your skills with a brush and roller and take care of them.

The finish you can get from spraying can be better then a brush or roller but it depends on the last paint job and your skills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Backroll primer too. For masking carpet, that's why I tuck it under baseboard. I like a FineFinish tip for trim. 210, 312, 412, or 414.
SuperPaint recommends a .015 minimum orifice. Should I use a different paint or water it down or ?
 

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SuperPaint recommends a .015 minimum orifice. Should I use a different paint or water it down or ?
Superpaint reccomends you use a giant fan to waste paint and create errors that require more sundries and paint. The paint store is the painters foremost enemy.
 
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