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There is some good advice there and I have thanked the post that I agree with the most. In short, there are three stages to remedying the defects:

1. Identification
2. Planning
3. Execution

Firstly, the original poster seems a little overwhelmed by the size of the task - don't be, just break it down as much as you can:

- break it down by level
- break it down by zone
- break it down by room
- break it down by trade grouping (eg. substructure, superstructure, finishes, services, etc)
- break it down by trade

For identification, most of the posts above have described an OK way to ID things in one way or another. In Australia we have things called "Inspection and Test Plans" which you may also use stateside. In laymans terms, they are a checklist, or series of questions. Develop an ITP for each trade, eg. for painting:
1. Does wall and ceiling paint appear to have sufficient coverage under a fluorescent light?
2. Does gloss paintwork have even and sufficient coverage?
3. Is gloss paint hardened and not malleable?
4. Have all unpainted surfaces been cleaned of paint spatter
... etc.

For planning, I would get your programmers to load the entire punch list into a "punch list" programme. Make sure they apply reasonable time frames to remedy each defect. Then get them to filter the programme according to each subcontractor and have a unique programme issued to each. Make sure they know that if the works are not completed in this timeframe that works will be completed by others and backcharged accordingly.

For execution, make sure that each of your foremen's duties and responsibilities are limited to certain zones, or floors, and that they are responsible for meeting their own programme in that zone. Try to creat a little competition between the foremen/zones! If you can get approval for it, apportion a small amount of the $150k as a bonus. Make sure that your programmers actively and objectively track progress and report to you (or the Senior PM/whoever) on a regular basis - at least weekly.
 

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I never had one this big, when I ran subdivision (townhomes), I had 3 people who'd spend every waking hour doing punchlist, 1 male, 2 female, The male can lift heavy stuff, the females had better eye for detail. They would work unit by unit, one by one and if it was something a sub was needed for I got the call and arranged it that day.
 

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I never had one this big, when I ran subdivision (townhomes), I had 3 people who'd spend every waking hour doing punchlist, 1 male, 2 female, The male can lift heavy stuff, the females had better eye for detail. They would work unit by unit, one by one and if it was something a sub was needed for I got the call and arranged it that day.
I think that is good idea. It is better to have some people that will focus on the punch list.
 

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I've been in this position before, I've punched out over 600,000 sqft on a project during a summer a couple years back.

Here are some things that helped me:

1, do not put EVERYTHING on your initial punchlist. The AE and owner WILL find somethings wrong regardless of how good you try to do your prepunch (I call the GC punch prior to the Arch and Owner a prepunch). If you correct everything ahead of time they will just over scrutinize the space and you may end up fighting with them over items that exceed the requirements of the project.

2, Blue tape is your BEST FRIEND when it comes to the painter's punchlist. Repaint west wall at ceiling may make sense on the punchlist to you because you saw it but when the painter has a lot of stuff to fix it's way easier to put a little pice of tape on the wall to show them exactly what you are talking about, you can get painters tape in multiple colors so assigning a color to a trade can help for your top 3-4 culprits.

3, assign items by sub, when I did the punchlist for this project I took over from someone who had gone through about 80,000sqft of space and had generated a list of only deficient items, put yourself in the sub's shoes; would you want to read through 1000+ items to hunt/look for things that MAY be your responsibility? I found that by assigning responsibility to items in conjunction with threatening to withhold payment, punchlist progress increased by over 200%

4, make manageable areas, you can't expect a sub to fix 150,000sqft of space in a week and realistically you can't follow up and ensure that the space is good to go while looking at the space for the next week. I found that with 2 people 50-70,000sqft a week was manageable.

5, If you spend more than 2 hrs a day at your desk YOU'RE NOT DOING YOUR JOB CORRECTLY. This was the biggest thing I noticed, the guy working PL before me would only spend 3-4hrs a day in the building, I spent upwards of 7hrs a day out there. The results are twofold; First, more time = more space covered and more space verified for completion, 2 when the subs start seeing a guy walking around all day everyday with a clipboard doing punchlist they will notice that you are not taking closeout lightly and will most likely become more proactive themselves in helping future areas be more complete.


Hopefully this helps, I know it's my first post but i've spent a lot of trolling these boards over the years and have decided it's time to give back since i've taken in a lot of good knowledge.
 

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Hey guys... We are nearing the end of a 5 story, 300,000 sq/ ft. mixed office and labs fit out with over 700 rooms.
I know there are probably a few questions to be answered before commenting, but here goes.
We are creating the first punch-list, executing it and then the owner and architect together come up with theirs after wards. The senior PM's have already come up with a matrix and excel sheet that we will follow ($150,000 riding on 1500 items or less at substantial completion, that's why their in on it)
Here's my question? For a project this big, what would be your procedure for creating the punchlist and executing it?
What tips do you guys have?
I have done punchout, but nothing of this size and magnitude with so much riding on it.

Thanks yall!!
Spend some money on a software called blubeam. It's a PDF editing software. Using the digital copies of the plans, you can create a punch list complete with keynotes on the plans. You can filter out marks per subcontractor if needed. it creates a table and will use your preset symbols to mark certain tasks.

This also makes finding the locations of issues much easier on a large scale. The subs will love it. It's a little work on your end, but could be well worth the reward.

It's how I managed the punch list on a 13 story office building and large pharma project. If you are curious, pm me and we can talk further.
 

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Wow. Page 2 the first one down is almost a year old? No one uses this forum. Ha.

Wonder if they made it. Wonder how many times the subs were pissed because they did 3 punch lists. I'm always careful to call my list a "Completion List" instead of a punch. Punch is what the Architect and Owner do.

Then at some point the warranty list gets created. Lol
 

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I've done a fair amount of work on big projects like this but I'm usually the finish carpentry sub (doors, millwork installation, accessories ...). The projects I do are in health care, government and university buildings etc.

Most of the time a job that size is finished in phases, either formally as in phased occupancy dates or scheduling where a section of the job is completed then we move on to the next section.

The best way to handle the punch list is to start by having the asst. super or field eng. go through the job before the finishing trades are out of an area and cover the major stuff before the official walk through and punch out process begins. No trade wants to be givin a 500 page punch list 2 weeks before occupancy. I like to get everything done before I vacate an area. My tools are there, the guys are in the area, it doesn't disrupt my work flow or cost shoe leather and time to track down long passed over items. The last weeks or so of the job is spent adjusting hardware and looking after the few deficiencies that remain.

If you stay on top of the punch list as your finishing trades roll through the job, wing by wing, floor by floor or whatever, there shouldn't be a lot for the final punch list and it's manageable for the GC and the trades.
 

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Hey guys... We are nearing the end of a 5 story, 300,000 sq/ ft. mixed office and labs fit out with over 700 rooms.
I know there are probably a few questions to be answered before commenting, but here goes.
We are creating the first punch-list, executing it and then the owner and architect together come up with theirs after wards. The senior PM's have already come up with a matrix and excel sheet that we will follow ($150,000 riding on 1500 items or less at substantial completion, that's why their in on it)
Here's my question? For a project this big, what would be your procedure for creating the punchlist and executing it?
What tips do you guys have?
I have done punchout, but nothing of this size and magnitude with so much riding on it.

Thanks yall!!
Hey bujayly! If you're looking to create a punch-list, you can check this blog here https://gobridgit.com/blog/the-essential-punch-list-template-for-excel/ regarding punch lists for construction projects. A downloadable Excel punch list template is also included in the blog as well as a punch list software if you would like to try an upgraded version that's specifically designed for this type of task. Hope this helps!
 

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If this was a recent thread I would have told the guy to have the owners come up with their punch list before you work on yours. Why would you want to do this process twice?

And ya, it was a big job. I'm hoping he got the punch list done by now, it's been 9 years or so.
 

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If this was a recent thread I would have told the guy to have the owners come up with their punch list before you work on yours. Why would you want to do this process twice?

And ya, it was a big job. I'm hoping he got the punch list done by now, it's been 9 years or so.
Never done that. The goal is no punch list from a client, telling then to walk it before I consider the project done is not how I work. Even commercial, more than a couple items usually something not defined in the scope is not normal. Last year we did that addition for the ymca and met at 11, walked with 3 different directors, got a 30 min punch we knocked out after i bought lunch
 
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As to the OP, I'm pretty sure whoever is actually in charge of making sure that punch list gets executed is not going to need to know how to perform or make the punch lists.
 
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