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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys... We are nearing the end of a 5 story, 300,000 sq/ ft. mixed office and labs fit out with over 700 rooms.
I know there are probably a few questions to be answered before commenting, but here goes.
We are creating the first punch-list, executing it and then the owner and architect together come up with theirs after wards. The senior PM's have already come up with a matrix and excel sheet that we will follow ($150,000 riding on 1500 items or less at substantial completion, that's why their in on it)
Here's my question? For a project this big, what would be your procedure for creating the punchlist and executing it?
What tips do you guys have?
I have done punchout, but nothing of this size and magnitude with so much riding on it.

Thanks yall!!
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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Wow. I've never done anything that large either. First thing that comes to mind is to try to streamline the work, both in terms of "type of task" and location.

Rather than try to complete one room at a time, list all rooms that need paint touchup, for example, in geographical order. Then your crew(s) can set up for that one type of task and bang through it right down the list of rooms. Do that for each type of task and try to set it up so different crews aren't getting in each others' way.

Should be pretty easy to set up a spreadsheet with the rooms listed vertically, and a column for each type of task.
 

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The procedure would be to be unbiased. Go over everything with a fine tooth comb. Once you have a substantial list hand it off to be completed and continue combing.

What you have is small potatoes. I have punched out a few towers from bottom to top and top to bottom. GC does punch, Architect does punch, and then the owner. Pretty typical. Just wait till the architect starts nit picking your screw heads in the doors. :laughing:

And the more I think about this the more I think you came from residential. Hopefully the 1-2 months of punchlist was actually bid into the job. And any commercial estimator that missed that should be fired.
 

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Holy Crap!
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My experience with large jobs like these is to punch the room out before your move onto the next room. I am only talking about deficiencies here. Anything damaged during construction, after you leave is another issue.

At this point, with the project being in its "completion" phase, allow the owner and architect to walk through and do a joint punch list. Then, I would recommend tackling it by floor. Start from the top and work your way down and be very particular as you do not want to have to go "back" another time.

You creating your own punch list now may only be wasting more money in the long run as the architect and owner are still going to find their own "deficiencies."

At my previous employer, we would make weekly punch lists and include all of the trades and forward the list. At first it sounded very redundant and like a lot of extra work. As a superintendent though, it was my responsibility. There is nothing better then having no punch list at the end of the project. Talk about saving some money!

Hope this helps and GOOD LUCK :thumbsup:
 

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My experience with large jobs like these is to punch the room out before your move onto the next room. I am only talking about deficiencies here. Anything damaged during construction, after you leave is another issue.

At this point, with the project being in its "completion" phase, allow the owner and architect to walk through and do a joint punch list. Then, I would recommend tackling it by floor. Start from the top and work your way down and be very particular as you do not want to have to go "back" another time.

You creating your own punch list now may only be wasting more money in the long run as the architect and owner are still going to find their own "deficiencies."

At my previous employer, we would make weekly punch lists and include all of the trades and forward the list. At first it sounded very redundant and like a lot of extra work. As a superintendent though, it was my responsibility. There is nothing better then having no punch list at the end of the project. Talk about saving some money!

Hope this helps and GOOD LUCK :thumbsup:
You have never done a large commercial project before?:rolleyes:
 

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Per your plans all rooms should be numbered or designated.
Go floor by floor, room by room. Don't forget to include hallways, elevators, stairwells etc. If nothing to add to punch list, note as so. This way Archy & PM will know that you have at least looked at the room. If you are thorough in this manner, honest in noting deficiencies & prompt in correcting them, Archy & PM will know you are not trying to "get away with anything" and will feel more at ease when doing their walk through.
 

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first thing is to sort the list in excel into two differnt out puts,
one listing by trade contartcor per level, these given to subb's.
one list sort by room per level these given to your foreman,

in order to get the 150k fast i would put 2 or 3 foreman across the floors have sub's supply 3 men min, painters will be more,
set up 3 crews one foreman, plus one each from key trades knock off items from each trade as rooms done have painter back through, clean and get client signed off.

its a tough gig, you will be getting pressure from above and the trades who are off on a new project
 

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It has been 11 years since I had a job of that magnitude, now as I recall was half through the punch out process when 9-11 hit.

I had built two mid-rise hotels (10-12 stories) next to the other with 430 keys (guest rooms) which totaled about 600+ rooms.

We had multiple crews (3 or 4 total) each assigned to a floor, each crew consisted of a lead trade who was put in charge and responsible for punching out the floor and getting the owners rep (the rep had acceptance authority) to sign off on each room on a floor then the common areas of the floor, then the floor was marked off as completed, on to the next floor.

The process took one full month, got it opened and they have been selling those 430 rooms ever since for the past 10 plus years.

Just hope that the owner/architect/rep has some level of motivation and sensibility about them to get through the process without getting bogged down.

Good luck, Don
 
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I was thinking that this would be great use for some sort of app for an Ipad. Each floor plan with every room color coded which when tapped opens up all the punch list task for that room both completed and pending. Green for done, orange and yellow for varying states and red for untouched. I wonder if BIM would work for something like this?

In place of developing an entire software app I would make a spreadsheet that effectively conveys the same info. Color code rooms or tasks so you can quickly see where the bulk of the work lies. Also maybe include a "Reviewed" column so you can see who signed off on what. Like was said before, different formats so you can sort by trade/sub, work, room/level and finished/unfinished. Let us know what you end up doing and how it works, what went well and what didn't.
 

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first thing is to sort the list in excel into two differnt out puts,
one listing by trade contartcor per level, these given to subb's.
one list sort by room per level these given to your foreman,
This is how I would do it. Then track back to it as each room/trade finishes
 

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Have the contractors produce their own punch lust, then check and add to the list accordingly. Give them a template to work from. Contractors need to have some skin in the game, and in most circumstances they will fix items on their list before it ever gets to you :)
 

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I would suggest the following.

1.) Invest in Prolog by Meridian systems http://www.meridiansystems.com. With this software you can sort your lists by Area, Sub, Date, Written By etc.
You can do your initial lists, and then add the architects, owners, your boss and everybody elses lists. I even add items from codes inspectors and fire marshalls, so I have everything in one place. Then you can sort the items by "written by" and print.

2.) Using this system you can print a separate sheet for each room and post on the doors or windows. Have the subs check off on the sheet in each room as the work off the list.

3.) You can also sort by "sub" or "responsible for" so you get a separate list for each sub to be faxed or emailed. I give a date to complete, usually one week.

4.) There is a separate column for "value" for each item. If the sub does not complete their list by the required date, they get another list with the value for each item, with the explanation that this is what they will be back charged if not completed with in 48hrs.

I know the above sounds like an advertisement for Prolog, but it has really helped me get some massive punchlists under control. It's pricey, but worth it not just for punchlists by for project administration in general.

The other piece of advice I can give you is that 95% of your items will be repetitive, i.e. " touch up drywall", "adjust cabinet door" etc. Come up with a list of repetitive items and number them, then when you are walking just write down the number instead of writing it out each time. Lots of ways to come up with a shorthand for those repetitive items, just think it thru before you start.
 

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last hotel i did i went thru and made the punchlist room by room. i used excel. print off a sheet for each room and tape it to each door. schedule the work per area (like one floor a day or something similar) and when subs finish in that area, walk thru it and sign off when its done (like the end of the day).
i would also have a master list with me marking off whats done and whats not.
do not let the subs mark off when they are done, cause they lie. and just know that some one is gonna throw the paper taped to the door away. it happens.

who ever said ipad for this, i was thinking the same thing. how perfect would an ipad or iphone be. they can run excel. mark it off electronically while in the room and send it back to the project managers before your even out of the building.
 

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I find it useful to grab the painter and a carpenter when I start punching, that why you don't always have to put the minuscule stuff on the punch they can fix as they go. A pot of coffee never hurt either.
 

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Define QA/Punch-put Process and Computerize

When approaching similar punchout stages of projects of the same size or larger, here is an approach I have used:

1. Define the Quality Acceptance Standard - Perform a "test" inspection with a representative from the Owner and the Architect on a few of the rooms within the project. This will allow you to see what "they" are looking for in terms of quality. In addition, include your (i.e. GC) defects as well on the list. This will enable you to create the quality "standard" expected by the Owner. This standard then can be used to educate other members of the GC quality team and the Trade Contractors on the project as to what "complete" actually means to the owner.

2. Define a Pre-GC Inspection Process to the used by the Trade Contractors - Using the data collected in Step One above, create a generic inspection checklist that the Trade Contractors use to document their inspections of their work. Each trade contractor inspects their work, then signs off each "unit" prior to the GC's inspection. This sheet should be hung in each "unit" or room so that a record if trade contractor inspections is maintained and enables members of your team to know if a Unit is ready to be inspected by the GC team.

3. Computerize the process - Based on my experience, a 700 room project will have at least an average of 25-50 items per room documented by the GC, architect and the Owner. The goal of steps 1, 2, and 3 is to reduce the time it takes to get the interior finish to the "substantial completion" stage with an average of 2 items per Unit/Room (1400 items, 100 items below your bonus target). I have used a system on more than one project, called E-Z Punch to computerize these sort of projects. The system is easy to use on PDAs the company provides and there is no need to manually produce inspection/punch out reports for distribution. The system is pricey, but since your company is in the running for a $150k bonus, the E-Z Punch system will help you get the bonus. In fact, we have used the E-Z Punch system in one project where we delivered an 800 unit project early securing a $1M bonus.

By using the E-Z Punch system we used far less people inspecting and producing reports, and more people directing trade contractor crews to resolve punchout items. The E-Z Punch system has helped us save literally 1,000s of hours on project inspection and inspection report creation time. Go to E-Z Punch punchlist software web site to learn more.

4. After the GC inspection, hang a punchlist report in each unit for the trade contractor to refer to finish their work. Also send a report to each trade contractors site supt with the appropriate deadline to correct the defects per your company's standard contract's time limits.

5. Manage the Trade Contractors to Eliminate Repeated Defects - One of the benefits of the E-Z Punch system is that the same issues are documented using the same terminology. This allows for you to identify "repeated defects" and enable the trade contractors to eliminate these defects before the Trade Contractor QC people or your QC people would ever inspect a unit.

6. Monitor Inspection Trends to More Effectively Manage Trade Contractors - One more thing, you should have a high-level report that shows three trendlines that present the total number of defects identified, the total number of defects corrected, and the total number of defects that are still open. This will allow you to monitor these quality trends as your team inspects and allows you to monitor Trade Contractor response times necessary to complete their work. The E-Z Punch system can be used to produce this report as well. This will enable your team to "drive" the trade contractors towards completing units/floors/areas in a sequence in which as you inspect more and more of the project, the number of defects you find in each unit will decrease, while areas of the project are ready for the final Owner acceptance inspection.

Just my thoughts. Hope they are helpful. Good luck and be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for all the input guys.
The office heads decided to hire an ex-super to come in and handle the list.
:sweatdrop:
 

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Thanks for all the input guys.
The office heads decided to hire an ex-super to come in and handle the list.
:sweatdrop:
So it must be somebody like Griz....Semi-retired.:laughing:

Is he going to work the list off, or just write it and crack the whip?
 

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I thought the proper way to punch a multi-story building was to start work on the top floor, and work your way down punching as you go. Work can be ongoing at multiple floors, but as you go down, the floors get punched and no one should have any reason to enter already punched floors above. The punch out process begins WAY before the end of the project and the standard of what is acceptable by the construction team is determined early on and continues throughout completion.
 

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Punch list

Hey guys... We are nearing the end of a 5 story, 300,000 sq/ ft. mixed office and labs fit out with over 700 rooms.
I know there are probably a few questions to be answered before commenting, but here goes.
We are creating the first punch-list, executing it and then the owner and architect together come up with theirs after wards. The senior PM's have already come up with a matrix and excel sheet that we will follow ($150,000 riding on 1500 items or less at substantial completion, that's why their in on it)
Here's my question? For a project this big, what would be your procedure for creating the punchlist and executing it?
What tips do you guys have?
I have done punchout, but nothing of this size and magnitude with so much riding on it.

Thanks yall!!
Take a deep breath and complete your punch list the PM punch list will surely reflex yours, leaving you with minimum to do.
Let them do their job and you do yours and at the end you will realize it wasn't that bad, my favorite part of the job is the punch list, this shows off your real skills in getting things done correctly and efficiently.
This is were you create a name for yourself and you'll get paid.
 
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