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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I've lurked on this forum for awhile and never posted until now. I was looking for some pointers on an interior floor demo/concrete job that came to me from a GC that I Know. The Job is in a food processing Warehouse that will be operational during the excavation. The floor is 20,000 sq/ft with the existing floor being 6 inches thick with wire.(I cut out parts during the winter for some floor drains so I can verify the Thickness) After the concrete is removed an additional 12 inches of dirt/fill will have to be excavated.
Now, the gc has said that the construction area is to be fenced in, with a double layer of plastic to the ceiling. My Idea was to saw cut the entire floor with electric/and or hydraulic saws into 2' x 3' pieces, use 1 mini excavator, and 2 skidsteers equipped with scrubbers, for removal of the concrete. Then I would switch to tooth buckets on the skids to remove dirt. All items would be removed through an opening cut out in the side of the building. after excavating for the new drains, 6 inches of engineered stone,4 inches insulation, and 6 inches of concrete. Any input would be helpful
 

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sounds like a good plan of attack. what kind of filtration/negative pressure/etc are you required to provide (since its a food facility)?
 

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Working in an operating food processing facility is going to be challenging to say the least.

Deter brought up a huge point. DUST....

Your separation wall will have to be airtight. You will need some very large exhaust fans and a source of clean intake air.

What about noise? If any part of the facility is operating during your work hours this could potentially be a huge issue.

Anyone check if your health dept. has any concerns?

Sufficient power available to run equipment you want to use?

Adequate exterior space for transfer trucks, spoils stockpile?

Exhaust air going to contaminate any air intakes to plant?

Any utilities in the existing slab?

That's quite a bit of material for a couple of skid steers & a mini ex to move.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hammer it and load it out. Why waste time sawing t
Didn't want to hammer it out in order to limit the amount of potential dust. I don't have the Job , I'm just trying to get ideas about how to attack it. It's a tight access area, but I can get more Machines in if it looks possible. I was going to place 5 or 6 Air scrubber machines around the areas we would be working in, as well as setting up somekind of exhaust system. Thanks for any input or Ideas.
 

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We Put Poles In Holes
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My dad owns a food processing facility with a 60' x 100' cooler that we put an addition on. We put up a temporary wall and spray foamed it to make sure it was air tight. Food health inspectors like to see things clean.
 

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Project Superintendent
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Sawing it up is definitely the way to go. I assume it has wire mesh, which the hammer won't cut, you will be fighting mesh forever. I guarantee the right guy with the right equipment can saw cut a 2 x 3 square quicker than hammering and hand cutting the mesh. Plus you got neat little stackable squares that you can pick up and stack easily, and no dust if you use some water with that blade.

You may want to consider a lull or some other piece of equipment with forks for pick up and loading of the slabs, and if you got room for a full size backhoe the dirt excavation will go a lot faster than a mini.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
What about using a drop hammer to break it up? I pay approx $6.00 a foot for concrete sawing that would get expensive fast.
My original idea was to use a drop hammer, but for whatever reason that hasn't really picked up as an option around here. The rental companies aren't really stocking stocking them. The videos I watched of them in use looked like a viable option. Floor to ceiling is about 28 ft
 

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Precision 10
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The drop hammer method was used on a 10 mile highway replacement near me. The drop hammer was used then an excavator was used to pull out all the rebar in large sheets, folded up and scraped. The pulverized concrete was then scooped up and disposed of using dump trucks. I think you could pay for a drop hammer on this job versus paying some one to cut the concrete.
 

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I would get a saw cutting company to price the cutting. Then use a large hoe to lift the slabs up. Drill two opposing holes about 1 1/2" dia by the thickness of the slab. Insert two 1 1/4 bars with eyes welded on the end to lift the slab and a fork truck to haul it out.
 
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