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Radical Basement Dweller
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Discussion Starter #1
Replaced a shutoff and drain valve at a beach house today. The main is 1' out in the yard and in the ground maybe 24".

The drain has been dripping for years and the supply line shutoff just started leaking.

I have a cavity probably 10" x 12" that extends down to where it hooks up with the main supply line.

Fiberglass insulation was there before. I'm wondering if blown in insulation would be better? I'd shove some heavy plastic down to keep it off the dirt and any moisture, then fill the cavity with blown in up to where the access door will be....and fiberglass stuffed in from there up another 2'.

Yes...no?

Thanks.

Broadkill1.jpg
 

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Super Moderator
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i wouldn't use the blown in just for the hassle in removing it if you ever had to.

maybe wrap some batt(s) in a big garbage bag and stuff them in there.

i suppose the blown in stuff in a garbage bag would work also.
 

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Radical Basement Dweller
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Discussion Starter #4
Should the batts be stuffed down tight or not?
 

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They just have to fill the cavity completely. Line the sides of the cavity leaving extra out the top, then fill with rock wool. As a practical matter, some of it is going to get compressed placing around pipes. You just have to get it snug.

Seal up the top of the plastic when you're done. You're just trying to keep water draining to the outside walls.
 

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As far as I understand compressing batts reduces the r value, but if you stuff it to capacity I'm sure itll make up for that loss. Some spots are impossible not to compress it a bit so its sort of moot.
 

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Business Owner
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I agree with HDavis regarding STONE wool (mineral wool):

"Water Repellent"

"ROCKWOOL stone wool is water repellent yet vapor permeable"

"The long-term R-value of stone wool is unaffected by moisture over time, due to the inherent drying potential of the product"

"Completely resistant to rot, mildew, mould and bacterial growth—contributing to a safer indoor environment"

** My thought is since it is water repelling and vapor permeable that it would be more likely to pass a small drip and allow it to evaporate out before freezing.
 

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Radical Basement Dweller
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Discussion Starter #9
Got everything taken care of...stuffed full of "Rockwool"...R-30...sealed all places air could come in and made a new panel for the front. Lip on the inside for the door to seal against and overlay frame on the outside for more weather protection.

Now if they remember to tighten the female hose connector when they drain the house...things should be good.

They won't.

Broadkill plumbing.jpg
 
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