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#1 stunner
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It's been around awhile, if I remember correctly GAP donated several thousand/mill pairs of jeans during the creation of this method. It does have a 60% increase in cost compared to fiberglass (it did last time I priced it) but if you can offset the cost by getting your children or grand kids to put it up you may be able to have competitive pricing to fiberglass. :)
 

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Used it a couple of times at the homeowners request and am not really impressed. It's more difficult to cut and has all the problems associated with batt insulation. Dense pack or spray cellulose is much better and even greener
 

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Used it a couple of times at the homeowners request and am not really impressed. It's more difficult to cut and has all the problems associated with batt insulation. Dense pack or spray cellulose is much better and even greener
I agree with everything above except the comment on cellulose regarding greener. Sprayed fiberglass is a better product than either of these.
 

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Really? fiberglass is better and greener? I think you'd have a hard time explaining that to the building science people.
That depends on which building science people you talk to. Everyone has a different opinion or reasoning these days. Many times, the science does not meet the field reality. ie..the installation of a product will change it's effectiveness. So is it practical to perform an installation to lab standards. Can you expect consistency from the hired hands of your supplier. I have not seen it in practice. (btw, I am referring to blown fiberglass not batts for clarity here)

It depends on what you mean by greener. blown fiberglass combined with some advanced framing techniques are a greener product from the standpoint of indoor environmental quality. Cellulose tends to cause mold issues down here in the south. Especially if blown in too wet. Fiberglass has no molding properties. I tend to get more complaints of "dusty" attics with clients who have cellulose on their ceiling deck.

If you are referring to effectiveness, blown fiberglass has a higher r-value per inch than cellulose (if installed correctly)

The last quotes I got on blown fiberglass show it to be only about $500 more expensive for the Spyder product on a 2200 SF home. So it is not greener regarding the bank account unless you look at the life cycle of the product and use the energy savings to recoup the cost. Unfortunately, this can only come in good faith because many customers these days will not want to absorb the extra cost.

That being said. Celbor makes a cardboard insulation that they claim is carcinogen free which is really effective when combined with a thorough poly-seal job. I would like to try the product one day because I think that the long term health risks should be considered when making a home more green. Unfortunately, the last quote I got was nearly double the cellulose (shredded paper with borates) price.
 

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Never worked down South but you can still have lots of problems with mold and fiberglass also if it gets damp.
I stand corrected. I wrote that fiberglass has no molding properties. That is incorrect. I must have been on autopilot when I wrote that because it is an absurd statement. :shutup:

but I was referring to the installation process. Is it true that fiberglass is blown in almost dry?

It is my understanding that cellulose is blown in much wetter and therefore takes longer to dry. Especially is humid climates. This often translates into hidden mold problems with uninformed contractors who sheet rock too soon.

Now, just to be fair and play devils advocate, fiberglass IS a more hazardous product during installation.
 

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I saw Mike Holmes use it on one of his shows.. Looked neat, but it also looked like it took longer to install.. Keep in mind Mike Holmes and his association with product placement...
 

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I stand corrected. I wrote that fiberglass has no molding properties. That is incorrect. I must have been on autopilot when I wrote that because it is an absurd statement. :shutup:

but I was referring to the installation process. Is it true that fiberglass is blown in almost dry?

It is my understanding that cellulose is blown in much wetter and therefore takes longer to dry. Especially is humid climates. This often translates into hidden mold problems with uninformed contractors who sheet rock too soon.

Now, just to be fair and play devils advocate, fiberglass IS a more hazardous product during installation.

I have done both bibs and wet spray cellulose. The cellulose does go in damper but the builders should listen to the recommended drying times and put a moisture meter on it before sheetrocking, which most of the time they don't. It must be a mess down South where it's humid. There dry dense pack cellulose would be good.
 

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Youngster
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I agree with everything above except the comment on cellulose regarding greener. Sprayed fiberglass is a better product than either of these.

Glad that you specified that you're in the south. Out here is northern Utah were we have extremes that you guys don't see, fiberglass is not a better product than cellulose. My climate:

Up to 105* summer
Down to -30* winter
Average humidity 20-30%

Blown fiberglass begins to lose R-value once you drop below 10*F, to the tune of about 50%. Fiberglass also loses R-value when compressed. Cellulose can be dense packed without adverse effects. Here where it is not humid, wet blown cellulose really doesn't present problems, but in the winter it does take too long to dry out. Dry blown dense pack cellulose is better, but costs more.

I use both. Gotta tell you. I've mistakenly assumed myself to be bullet proof a couple times and ventured into the attic without a mask to fix a problem or two. It is obvious to anyone who has ever done this, that cellulose is the preferred product in terms of inhalation.
 

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Louisiana is the difference

Glad that you specified that you're in the south. Out here is northern Utah were we have extremes that you guys don't see, fiberglass is not a better product than cellulose. My climate:

Up to 105* summer
Down to -30* winter
Average humidity 20-30%

Blown fiberglass begins to lose R-value once you drop below 10*F, to the tune of about 50%. Fiberglass also loses R-value when compressed. Cellulose can be dense packed without adverse effects. Here where it is not humid, wet blown cellulose really doesn't present problems, but in the winter it does take too long to dry out. Dry blown dense pack cellulose is better, but costs more.

I use both. Gotta tell you. I've mistakenly assumed myself to be bullet proof a couple times and ventured into the attic without a mask to fix a problem or two. It is obvious to anyone who has ever done this, that cellulose is the preferred product in terms of inhalation.
typical humidity here:between 70%-95%
temp nearly never drops below 20*F

That explains the difference in the performance. :thumbup:

We worry almost solely about heat and humidity control here.
 

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Glad that you specified that you're in the south. Out here is northern Utah were we have extremes that you guys don't see, fiberglass is not a better product than cellulose. My climate:

Up to 105* summer
Down to -30* winter
Average humidity 20-30%

Blown fiberglass begins to lose R-value once you drop below 10*F, to the tune of about 50%. Fiberglass also loses R-value when compressed. Cellulose can be dense packed without adverse effects. Here where it is not humid, wet blown cellulose really doesn't present problems, but in the winter it does take too long to dry out. Dry blown dense pack cellulose is better, but costs more.

I use both. Gotta tell you. I've mistakenly assumed myself to be bullet proof a couple times and ventured into the attic without a mask to fix a problem or two. It is obvious to anyone who has ever done this, that cellulose is the preferred product in terms of inhalation.
Just the thought of blown fiberglass turns me off, I can see it going the way asbestos did in the future.
 
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