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strat hd
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This client wants me to bid on building a three car garage, replace rotted wood siding before the painter gets there. Also replace the front porch deck and add some gingerbread type stuff that they allready purchased. These items are no problem.

They also want blown in insulation in the walls but don't want the plastic caps. They are suggesting removing a few pieces of the lap siding at the top of the first and second floors blow in the insulation and then replace the siding.

Are there any other ways or methods to do this ?
If so, can you also tell me the time frame involved ? (time per bay, ect.)
I am not an insulating contactor. If I should walk away from this one feel free to say so.

I doubt they will be able to get a permit for the garage as they dont have enough property for the zoning requirements. They seem to think they can since they're in the historical section of town. So i'm trying to get all the work I can at this job.
 

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You will need to remove a piece about a foot from the top, one in the middle and one about a foot from the bottom...you can try to remove the nails on the two consecutive pieces and try to slide the bottom piece out...but I suggest just cutting one piece just below the other with a utility knife and pop one piece out...then caulk alone that cut and nail it back when you are done...you only need one inch holes if you are going to use cellulose insulation. Check the basement and make sure the bays arn't open above the foundation wall...or you will be pumping forever until the basement is full.
 

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instead of drilling three holes like JonM suggested, we take off a row of siding below the windows, drill a 3" or 4" hole (4" gives you a little more room to play if there is newspaper, cardboard, or backplaster in the cavity) and push an 1 1/4" hose up the cavity.

As the cavity gets full, pull the hose out a few inches at a time. The time per cavity depends a lot on the blower and the insulation you are using. Smooth reducers from your blower hose to the 1 1/4" hose helps a lot.



There is a little more information starting on page 80 here:

http://www.state.mn.us/mn/externalDocs/Commerce/070704030802_Minnesota WFG.pdf


Hope that helps,

Tommytwo
 

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I read once that someone insulated from the inside right below the ceiling, and then put up crown molding.
I haven't done this, but I read about it (CT I think),
 

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Sean
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Another option is using slow expanding foam - small holes drilled in each bay (about the only time I would Icenyne - I think they lead the pack in this area)

In exterior patch with drywall or plaster, exterior - a dutchman of same material

Use a FLIR camera to confirm all bays filled --- it's amazing were they have filled in doorways, etc... blocking up the bays
 

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Curmudgeon
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My guess is holes above
and below windows.
Probably four holes, per stud bay,
per floor (my guess.)
The challenge will be first
figuring out where all of
the stud blocking is.
 

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KemoSabe
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I grew up in a town with homes that were built in the late 1800s to early 1900s. After having blown in insulation installed, most homes had a chronic problem with pealing paint, seems alot of those homes were sided over balloon framing with 1x8 sheathing boards. The blown in prevented the backside of the siding from getting proper air circulation. Many now have been sided with either aluminum in the 70s and 80s or more recently vinyl.:thumbsup:
 

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strat hd
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the replys. With this house being in the historical section there's no way the city would allow vinyl. Think i'm going to look at some of the other houses in that area to see how they dealt with the paint peeling issues. Most of the houses in this area are pristine.

There's about a half mile of these houses on Main st. Loneframer. They remind me of Cape May. This house is one of the small ones.

Flir camera $500. rental off the net. Good advice.
Did'nt know the wood plugs existed. :thumbsup:

I have no idea how long it will take to insulate this house so i'm going to bid time and material.

Thanks to all that replied.
 

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KemoSabe
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There's about a half mile of these houses on Main st. Loneframer. They remind me of Cape May. This house is one of the small ones.
Strat, I grew up in Millville, many of the earlier homes are very similar to Cape May, although not as elaborate as some. It's a shame that most of these homes have been turned into rental properties and the original architecture has been desicrated. Homes that would cost countless dollars to replicate today sell for under $150,000. You couldn't do the exterior siding/trim package for less than that. The city is trying to turn things around, much progress has already been made.:thumbsup:This home is listed at around $250,000 in the arts district.
 

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The wood plugs are a bad idea...expansion and contraction will push them out sooner or later...some of those clapboards are going to be cupped and you won't get a flush fit.
 

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Removing and replacing siding is the way to go but that's a big place with lots of short clapperboards and decorative trim around the windows. Even with the small hose up in the wall that's probably three hole minimum per bay more if they went nuts with the blocking even more. Also with all the pouch roof there is probably is no sheathing on the wall under it and will take longer.
 
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