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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are to begin installing sill plate tommorw but after checking for levelness found the foundation to be high 1 1/2" more in some areas than others. Also the center wall that will support the mid span of I-joist is at least and 1" or more higher than the perimeter block. Would you try to shim this out? Seems to far out to me to even attempt to shim. How do you try to level a foundation wall this far out?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Kinda what I figure also, we came into this job with mason already laying block. This was not the mason we would have used. What do you consider a acceptible out of level range say over 60ft 1/2 to 3/4 out?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I tell you I hate to frame on something this far out. I thought about framing up and pouring a 6" concrete cap with two #4 rebar ontop of the block around the perimeter to level it out. What you think?
 

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1/2" is about enough. 3/4" is still pretty acceptable and can be shimmed, but really isn't necessary. 1 1/2" is too much, doesn't matter if it's 10' or 100'. There are perfectly good levels made; water levels, laser levels, there's no reason they can't get it within 1/4" to 1/2" over the entire length. Especially with block.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree with you , I am the framing sub and had nothing to due with mason seems like framers are made out to be majicians and can fix anything. Would like to be able to fix this ourselves to get our project underway, we have been waiting 7 weeks on this mason to finish and this was what we got dealt in the end. If this guy tries to fix it himself it's un telling how long it would take him. We have advised the homeowner and GC of the problem yet they look to us for the answer and I have no good answer for them.
 

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The GC and homeowner know about it, I would include them in any solution.
It's easy to set a grade and get within a 1/2" of it...even closer. Too bad everything builds off of this.
rj
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I agree with you about them being part of the soulution. I am going down in the morning and get transit up and take readings around the perimeter to see exactly where the low/high spots are I will update on this tommorw.
 

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Ive ran into bad foundations to many times!!! I move forward, add the sill seal, anchor down the green sill plate then have building inspector check the anchor bolts. Once thats done and we laugh about the humps in sill plate. We then add another white sill plate with lay out on it, bust out the router and saddle notch the high spots down so the floor joists rest in the notch. sometimes after all that work we still have to add a metal shim under some joists that are low to raise them up. Then send the bill to the foundation guy if he is still in bussiness. It sucks having to double plate and notch the sill but you end up with a level floor.
 

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Ive ran into bad foundations to many times!!! I move forward, add the sill seal, anchor down the green sill plate then have building inspector check the anchor bolts. Once thats done and we laugh about the humps in sill plate. We then add another white sill plate with lay out on it, bust out the router and saddle notch the high spots down so the floor joists rest in the notch. sometimes after all that work we still have to add a metal shim under some joists that are low to raise them up. Then send the bill to the foundation guy if he is still in bussiness. It sucks having to double plate and notch the sill but you end up with a level floor.
This is unfortunately alot of work, but probably the lesser of all evils. This method will look very clean if done properly. If you need to be the man with the magic, this will keep the ball in your court so that you can move forward. If you're looking at an inch and a half in the worst case, the saw and a sharp chisel may be faster than the router. Several passes with the saw and chip out the fluff.
 

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I've encountered this problem too many times. Thats why if I don't know the foundation guy I try to charge hourly for the sills and set price for the rest. Some builders don't go for it but they all get charged if its really bad in the end. As far as fixing it. Around here we fill under our sills with non shrink grout. We usually shim up to about an inch or so and then fill in afterward with grout. I wouldn't do that for 1 1/2" though. It all depends on the foundation. If its only high in 1 or 2 spots try to chip it down level. If its different all over I would lay a double sill. Shave out the bottom sill with a chainsaw around the bumps and dips and dives once you get that level, put a second sill on top of that. Sometimes you may even have to cheat and shave out a 1/4" here and there depend on how bad it is. If the bottom sill is even a little low here and there say 1/4", you can shim on top of that to straighten the whole thing out.

If you use a combanation of all these techniques you should be able to fix it. Just remember to keep track of time and charge the builder a hefty hourly rate for doing this. (I'm sure he'll back charge the mason anyway. it isn't our job to fix this so we should be overly compensated for it. Like you say carpenters are often called upon to be magicians. Which, well, we are. Cheers and have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
you all have good ideas just wish one of them were fast but I guess that is what we encounter in this business always something. I will keep you guys updated on this and post some pics.
 

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Sounds like my latest project! We are on a Superior Walls foundation and there are places that are up to 1" out in 6 feet!
 
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