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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm installing a custom-made metal door frame into wood and was wondering what the best method to fasten it would be. The frame is hollow and unfortunately, there aren't any pre-drilled holes. I was thinking of buying four angle-brackets, screwing them into the frame at the bottom on the left and right and screwing them into the top on the left and right side and finally screwing it into the wood. I searched all over and nothing came up so pardon me for using CT as a last resort. So can you guys please suggest a cleaner method if one exists. Thanks!

EDIT: Pictures at the bottom!!!!
 

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solar guy
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Most steel bucks I have run into have been interior commercial doors or set into masonry in an exterior application..
they usually had adjustment screws at the top of the jamb and straps to fasten the bottom of the jamb. Sounds like you have something different?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, these were actually made in Mexico(Doors and Frame). Just a long hollow frame. Nothing pre-drilled, just a hinge at the top and bottom of the sides for the doors to be hung.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Haha, sh*t. These are actually doors that a client ordered and picked-up! Haha, buck, I have to make it a part of my vocab now. Well, I appreciate your input. Hopefully somebody can chime in with an idea, if not, I'll just go with the "L" bracket idea and try to hide and blend it as much as possible! Thanks!:thumbsup:
 

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welcome to CT, complete your profile , and intro yourself to the guys on the intro page, as far as your doors go, why not use longer screws through the hinge holes, that will take care of the hinge side, strike plate holes will give you one contact point, then predrill 2 more holes and you got it, hopefully the mat is thick enough to allow for countersink, GMOD
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
welcome to CT, complete your profile , and intro yourself to the guys on the intro page, as far as your doors go, why not use longer screws through the hinge holes, that will take care of the hinge side, strike plate holes will give you one contact point, then predrill 2 more holes and you got it, hopefully the mat is thick enough to allow for countersink, GMOD
Doing so right now. Thanks for the welcome! These are acutally hinges that are welded to the frame. Male/Female where you set the door over the top of the male part and slide the female onto it. (Damn that sounds dirty!) There are no holes whatsoever. I'm gonna try to do some more research tonight so hopefully I find something.
 

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Typically if its a welded frame the doors are "punched and dimpled" at the factory. That means they have a hole through the frame and are punched to allow for countersinking so you can screw right through the frame. I have installed doors by drilling them out and I have made a countersunk hole with a hammer and appropriately shaped steel piece and just "punching" the countersink into the frame. Another method we have used is to use a long screw with an oval head with a washer under it (the type used for framing decks, unfortunately the name eludes me at the moment) and has a torx drive. They make for a fairly neat installation and as long as you don't rip up the head when installing they don't catch on anything.
 

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The Duke
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Man would I like to see pics of this door frame. Welded hinges?

The commercial doors I have used are just as naptown describes. You may have to make your own securing system.

Some blocks to hold the top from moving left to right is all you need on the top of the door frame. It's keeping the lower part secure you have to come up with something.

Unless of course this whole door frame is flimsy, which sounds quite possible.
 

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Does not sound like any door frame I have ever used. Do you have a picture you can post?

BTW, when you say metal do you mean steel or aluminum?

Dave
 

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I'm installing a custom-made metal door frame into wood and was wondering what the best method to fasten it would be. The frame is hollow and unfortunately, there aren't any pre-drilled holes. I was thinking of buying four angle-brackets, screwing them into the frame at the bottom on the left and right and screwing them into the top on the left and right side and finally screwing it into the wood. I searched all over and nothing came up so pardon me for using CT as a last resort. So can you guys please suggest a cleaner method if one exists. Thanks!
Yeah, these were actually made in Mexico(Doors and Frame). Just a long hollow frame. Nothing pre-drilled, just a hinge at the top and bottom of the sides for the doors to be hung.
:whistling

I remember doing something similar many years ago. I usually place my screws behind he weather stripping anyways. Can't you just pre drill your holes behind the weather stripping? I would think that the door was designed for the fire rating (at least that was what I was told when I hung that one) and should have a steel jamb.
 

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Similar to what cbreeze said, the frame should be punched and dimpled. You can do it yourself but it would be easier to have a door/frame supplier do it as they have the tools to punch and dimple. They would also carry the proper fastening systems.
 

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If you can hide the screws behind the weatherstripping, great. Otherwise, drill and counter sink for #12 screws, so they are just below the surface.

Then fill will bondo and you're done. :thumbsup:
 

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Motorboatin' son of a ...
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Is this a commercial frame? Sounds like you need a frame dimpler.
http://shop.justdoortoolz.com/product.sc?productId=85&categoryId=3
Look at the pictures on that site to see how to use it.
Then you need some 3/8" screws (24x5") to screw into the stud.

If it wasn't prep'd like this with tabs to fold around the stud so it could be screwed in

Then you need to use he above method with the frame dimpler.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Wow! Thanks for all the great input you guys! Yeah, these doors weren't prepared at all. This place my client got them from is a little welding shop along the main strip in Rosarito, Mexico(for those familiar with the area). Sounds like I'm gonna go with the "punch, dimple, and bondo" idea. I'll take pictures for you guys today. Suprisingly, both the frame and doors are sturdy as hell!! My bro and I stood it on it's side vertically and there is hardly any bending or movement! No weather stripping here guys, it's going into an indoor office that's going to seperate it from the rest of the house. I'll definately post pics up when I get home. Once again, thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Alright you guys, you asked, so here they are. Pictures of the frame and where it's going to be. I figured rather then drilling holes and making dimples, I'll fasten it with a bunch of metal screws. I'll drill on the other side of the stud, through the wood, and into the metal. Sounds like the best idea to me. Here they are:
Here is the space they are going in:

This is the male/female hinge thing I was talking about for those who wanted to see:

Here is the frame itself:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Haha, the rust is definately not desired! It's seen the rain quite a few times. It'll be primered and most likely painted black.
 

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Have you considered using an epoxy and attaching them to the sides that way. I would normally not consider doing it that way but after seeing what they look like and what they are going to be used for as well as where they are a high grade epoxy might not be a bad way to go (notice the word 'might')................................
 
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