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Hello All,

Ive read alot on this forum but have not ever posted. I am currently building a 3 car detached garage for a my 1st customer ( I am 24 and just started my own side business). The area where the garage has been built used to have a carport which we tore down. The home owner did not want to re pour or mess with the existing concrete. My way around leveling everything out was to cut out an outline of concrete and dug footers and laid block. I am at the point now, knowing it would be a problem, to install garage doors. The openings are higher on the right side to left side of each door by exactly 3". I have thought of cutting the bottom panel at an agle to sit flush( being a metal insulated door). Other than that, I cant seem to find a company that can help me with this issue. Adding concrete to create a ramp of some style to each door sadly is not an option to the home owner. Any thoughts are appreciated.


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Butcher of wood and metal
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I would say you have a mess and a half. No way would I have agreed to build the garage with the floor that much out of level. I have no ideal how one would fix that now.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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The only not-so-practical way I can see of dealing with that situation is to mount the tracks with one of them 3" higher than the other. it would look like crap, but it would work. I think.
 

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The only not-so-practical way I can see of dealing with that situation is to mount the tracks with one of them 3" higher than the other. it would look like crap, but it would work. I think.
It wouldn't, it would just make the open way out of level or not at all. The tracks and door all need to be plumb and level to operate properly. It's possible to cut a bit off of the bottom of the high side track, you need to be careful not to cut too much though or the door won't close properly. The low side track can be cheated up a little off the floor too, the bottom roller just needs to stay inside it when the door is closed. Making up 3 inches would be tough.

I have run into this issue replacing an overhead door twice. The first time there was a huge dip in the center of the door. I took a piece of PVC 2x4 or something similar and scribed the shape to the bottom of the door, screwed it in from the bottom up and then installed the bottom seal track to it. It worked pretty well.


The second door was closer to your situation where the slab sloped from side to side and didn't work very well. If I remember correctly it was closer to a 2 inch difference. I tried the same trick with scribing a piece under the door but after attaching it found that it hit the top jamb. I wound up making the scribe piece smaller and taking up the worst of the gap with an oversized door seal. I think most doors come with a 3"-5", you could look for a larger size but it probably won't take out that much gap.
 

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Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
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Unfortunately, you'd need to saw cut the front where the door comes down, and pour a new, level slab.

But then, it will be too low or too high on one side.

Which leaves the only option that I can think of, is to cut the bottom of the posts off, and saw cut the entire width.

Then, form and pour concrete piers at each post location, so that the wood framing will be at the correct height above the concrete.

Of course, this will necessitate you building a temp wall a few feet inside of, and the entire width of, the garage.

Not cheap or quick. :no:

Or you could try something with swinging doors. Don't know how that would work.
 

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GC/carpenter
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Can you add something to the bottom of the door such as rubber or something. It's like trying to pick a turd up by the clean end.


Mike.
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I think you need to repour all the concrete in the garage and maybe 2ft into the driveway to make a softer transition.

Where the doors set off the high side or the low set. Garage door heights don’t have much room for error.
 

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I've seen professionally-installed garage doors with some kind of wedge applied to the bottom of the door. If I could remember where exactly, I'd drive by and snap some pics.

Hopefully the header is level, and you're just talking about a slope in the concrete.
 

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GC/carpenter
GC/Carpenter
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You could cut a groove in the concrete that's 3" to nothing at whatever the thickness of the panel is and it could lower into it.


Mike.
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Designer/Contractor
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Can you add something to the bottom of the door such as rubber or something. It's like trying to pick a turd up by the clean end.


Mike.
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I think you can buy special skirts for fubars like this, check with the garage door company(s).
 

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diplomat
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I have thought of cutting the bottom panel at an agle to sit flush
Well, the whole thing's a mess because of the floor, but maybe why not? Maybe could rivet on a new u-channel bottom custom bent up on a brake.
 

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Custom
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I don't know if there's a way to adjust the hardware to ease a solution, but even if there was, just like with the house overall, the most important visual lines are the tops and sides and I would imagine that would throw those askew... the only advantage you have here is visually, you can expect some visual variation of where it touches the ground... based on the customers reluctance to fix it with your original desired method, functionally, because of the 3", I don't see how to get around a scribing solution splitting the difference with a rubber gasket seal attached on the bottom and a door dam/weather stop on the floor to minimize the overall visual slope and provide sealing... 3 doors, it's still going to come with a cost...

Lay out the options (including the one you want to do) to the customer, with the pro's and cons, and let THEM decide, and then get it in writing, along with each methods limitations...
 

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My brother has a house that is probably 70 years old. His slope on the garage floor was almost 2" from side to side on an 8' door. I was able to remove the bottom weather strip, added a wedge of pvc, the reinstalled the weather strip. One of the unforseen issues after installing was that the taller side of the wedge would contact the side weather strip when the door was going down. I had to bump that weather strip out about 1/2" to remedy that. I can't imagine doing this for a customer, but with that slab existing, it is probably your only option.
 

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You may need to consider custom bottom panels for the doors.....

Have the panels made to incorporate the angle. The overall panel heights shouldn't be any higher than the designed height.

So basically your cutting back the door panel not extending it.

You may need to change the door you intend to use. Metal door maybe a sheet metal shop can help with fabrication.

Wood door maybe easier, or a millwork company.

And maybe the door manufacturer could custom make the bottom panels...

That's where I would start.

Probably looking at a premium, and project is not running on a premium. But it's probably the best looking solution.
 

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Wow. I'm guessing that they used to drive in from the house side, which is why the floor is pitched that way. What happens when rain or water gets in and it all runs to the low part of the garage? You can modify a wood door easily by cutting it on a matching angle and installing the hardware properly but it is going to look ridiculous.

I would bite the bullet and pour whole new floor. Maybe add a 2" apron up front and then a new floor from there back so your thinnest part of the new pour is 2".

Or jackhammer the whole floor out and start over. It is going to haunt you and them forever otherwise.

Sorry kid
 
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