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Finishing Carpenter
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
dealing with elevation changes. Usually its from a new hardwood/laminate floor, and that's either higher or lower than the tile in the next room (kitchen, or hall usually). I do not like the idea of cutting down all the rest of the baseboard just because there was an elevation change. I cut it on an angle!
Measure the diff. in height, (latest one was 1/2") mark that on the baseboard where its gonna sit on the floor(s)
from that point, I cut a taper to the end of the piece, or at least 6' away, so then I am back to the original height of the baseboard. Unless you are really looking, you can't see the "uphill" slant. My TS-55 festool track saw is a dream for this, very smooth.
It doe's however take a little time, so I build that into my price - not a lot but its something that adds to the cost.
fixing bellies in the floor? now that's a time killer!

Laurie.


www.lauriescustomfinishing.ca
 

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dealing with elevation changes. Usually its from a new hardwood/laminate floor, and that's either higher or lower than the tile in the next room (kitchen, or hall usually). I do not like the idea of cutting down all the rest of the baseboard just because there was an elevation change. I cut it on an angle!
Measure the diff. in height, (latest one was 1/2") mark that on the baseboard where its gonna sit on the floor(s)
from that point, I cut a taper to the end of the piece, or at least 6' away, so then I am back to the original height of the baseboard. Unless you are really looking, you can't see the "uphill" slant. My TS-55 festool track saw is a dream for this, very smooth.
It doe's however take a little time, so I build that into my price - not a lot but its something that adds to the cost.
fixing bellies in the floor? now that's a time killer!

Laurie.


www.lauriescustomfinishing.ca
Take a look at the whole area, Like kitchen/ dining adjoined, tablesaw. Different room then who cares.
 

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cutting angles with your chopsaw

Some of your more pickier homeowners may not go for the angled look of the base.

I usually just cut the base at 45 degree angles, going up or down as need be. (use an extra piece of base and draw lines extending out on top and bottom of base, then down or up; where lines connect or intersect is point of 45). It looks sharp. You can even go up or down stairways in this fashion.
 

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Project Manager
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Some of your more pickier homeowners may not go for the angled look of the base.

I usually just cut the base at 45 degree angles, going up or down as need be. (use an extra piece of base and draw lines extending out on top and bottom of base, then down or up; where lines connect or intersect is point of 45). It looks sharp. You can even go up or down stairways in this fashion.
You mean instead of a skirt board?? :eek:
 

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Project Manager
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bass - that's more of a landing, or very large step.

I'm thinking of your standard depth stairs - would you run base like that all the way up instead of a skirt?
 

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Hey Bass, I like to do the same however run a ripped down version of the base when dealing with a step/landing such as that.
Saw your curved crown article, have you ever thought of turning a round of baseboard on a lathe to deal with bullnosed corners? Too labor intensive?
 

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I had to do this to 150 or so steps for a Church. What a pain in the butt. Though I did have about a 1/2" of wiggle that the carpet would cover. Looked great when it was finished. :thumbsup:
 

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How did this thread go from base at floor transitions to stair step ups?

Laurie was talking about floor transitions.

We usually tapered them also, but it depended on where it was at, & the length of the taper. Short pieces sometimes had to be tapered out on the 2nd piece from transition, as in a 3 ft piece mating to an outside corner. It is always a judgement call on what is not noticable, & the level of finish work your working on.

Joe
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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Hey Bass, I like to do the same however run a ripped down version of the base when dealing with a step/landing such as that.
Saw your curved crown article, have you ever thought of turning a round of baseboard on a lathe to deal with bullnosed corners? Too labor intensive?
Turning is a good idea for base around bullnose corners. Turn it, drill out the bull nose radius on a drill press, then cut into quarters on the bandsaw.

Same could be done for stain-grade crown. I used plaster for paint grade crown (but base takes too much abuse for that).

Later,

Bass
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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How did this thread go from base at floor transitions to stair step ups?

Laurie was talking about floor transitions.

We usually tapered them also, but it depended on where it was at, & the length of the taper. Short pieces sometimes had to be tapered out on the 2nd piece from transition, as in a 3 ft piece mating to an outside corner. It is always a judgement call on what is not noticable, & the level of finish work your working on.

Joe
Hi Joe,

I actually do small floor height transitions the same way. I think it is safer to draw attention to the change in floor height, rather than disguise it. The OP mentioned a 1/2" drop. To help minimize the trip hazard, I drop the base 1/2" with a miter. It is not hard to do. Some people actually like the look. Seems like a nice touch rather than base off of level by 1/2" in a few feet.

Like the tapered base better? OK, but it makes goofy joints at each end of the tapered piece, due to the angles being off... seems like the same amount of work either way. So it is preference, and a minor safety consideration.

No big deal,

Bass

More than one way to do things.
 

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The Finisher
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Hi Joe,

I actually do small floor height transitions the same way. I think it is safer to draw attention to the change in floor height, rather than disguise it. The OP mentioned a 1/2" drop. To help minimize the trip hazard, I drop the base 1/2" with a miter. It is not hard to do. Some people actually like the look. Seems like a nice touch rather than base off of level by 1/2" in a few feet.

Like the tapered base better? OK, but it makes goofy joints at each end of the tapered piece, due to the angles being off... seems like the same amount of work either way. So it is preference, and a minor safety consideration.

No big deal,

Bass

More than one way to do things.
I also transition between different floor heights that way. Funny thing about Contractor Talk is you realize just how many others use the same techniques as you :thumbsup:.
 

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Finishing Carpenter
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
ok the first pic shows the elevation diff.

the second the "TS-55" sorry its fuzzy, blackberry cellphone pics :)

the third show's the cut

the fourth- installed.

I am not worried about the thread drift, sometimes there are some great ideas that come out when this happens. I be still larnin!!!!
 

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