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Hello I'm Matt,

This is my first post and I would just like to introduce myself before I ask my question. My story starts about 7 years ago when I was 19 and fresh in college, I started working for a general contractor doing a little of this and a little of that. I learned alot and enjoyed the work especially the trim and moulding work. Well the money got tight and another 2 1/2 years of college was not the most exciting thing at the time. I wound up joining the navy as a seabee hoping to gain a lot of good experience, boy was I wrong, sloppy work, real sloppy. In my off time I started reading any carpentry book I could get my hands on primarily focusing on finish work. I started my own little side business(set my shop up in my garage) and am doing enough work to keep myself busy in my spare time. Doing a little trim, matching existing cabinets and installing builtins, nothing spectacular just good quality work. Now I am stuck on a little island in the middle of nowhere as a project manager, not even 26 and I'm already off the jobsite managing two projects, that's the seabess for you. Hopefully that was'nt to painfull to read.

Question:

I will be getting out of the navy within the next year :clap: and am looking at an Industrial Woodworking Degree. Does anyone know of a good school to go to, preferably in the mid-west or east coast? Is this something that you would look for in/benefit a new employee? I really like building cabinets, but I equally enjoy installing trim and moulding. I really want to learn as much about the buisness end also, is this something that would be incorporated into the course? I have searched and came up with a few possibilities, but was wondering if anyone had more information or specifics.

I apologize for the long post, I know everyone here is busy and I would like to thank you for your time. I have been coming to this site for several years now and learn something new everyday, I can't tell you how inspiring it is to see the quality work and knowledge that is brought to this forum on a consistent basis. Thanks again, Matt.


PS; I included an attached picture of a project that I completed just before I deployed. A cherry corner entertainment center.
 

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Still have all my fingers
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755 Posts
I am sorry but I read the title of this thread and a certain Dire Straits song instantly popped into my head,

"But worst of all young man you've got an Industrial Woodworking Degree"


You mentioned that you didn't like being a desk jockey so I am curious as to why you would pursue a post secondary education which would almost certainly land you behind a desk yet again upon graduation.

If you are intent upon starting your own business someday I can see some logic but if you want to be on site or in the shop I think on-the-job training would be far more educational....hell, you'll even get paid.

Use your military benefits to pay for a Business Law degree and you'll actually be able to collect payment for your work,seriously.
 

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chief pencil holder
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1,605 Posts
A degree will help with the office end of things, my weakest point But you will learn more in a week around great carpenters than in a year at school. The most important thing is to find good people to work for/with.
 
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