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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This older home had lots of character, but only a tiny bath on the second floor—which had been added to a cramped attic space. The owners loved their home, but wanted a true master bath.

Finding space for a modern master bath in an old home is typically very challenging. Unfortunately, there was no space to be re-purposed from any of the adjacent bedrooms or storage closets.

To accomplish our goals, we planned a renovation that would expand an existing shed dormer, to create the master bath the homeowners really needed in order to keep from having to look for another home.

Preliminary Plan:


Scope of work:
1 Remove the existing attic bath, roof section, and shed dormer siding and trim.
2 Frame the new master bath over the existing footprint of the first floor, extending the shed roof to cover it.
3 Install new exterior trim, siding, and roof.
4 Bring new plumbing supplies and drains from the basement to service the bath, and relocate the vent stacks through the new roof section.
5 Build a custom shower, water closet, and dual vanity in the new space.

BEFORE:


AFTER:


BEFORE:



AFTER:
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
During the project, we encountered the following challenges:

1 The roof over the existing shed dormer had deflected 2” in the middle and was over-spanned. This had to be made flat and supported by interior members braced to load bearing walls.

2 The over hang which was to be kept on the opposite side of the dormer was found to be very poorly built from it’s original construction and had also deflected significantly. We removed it completely and built a new, properly supported and trimmed overhang.

3 The siding on the same side as the sagging overhang had been severely damaged by the last re-roof. The roofers had cut the bottom of the siding up from the roof line for flashing and installed a 1x trim over the gap that wasn’t the proper depth. The siding was split in several places from their work and someone had done a very sloppy caulk job. While we would have preferred to have kept the original siding and trim, we had to remove and replace it to make it sound.

4 The original framing of the floor members in the space were of sufficient size, but had settled significantly out of level. We had to sister each one to level the floor for the new bath.





 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The design was by Matt Harris.

Here's an overview of the materials and fixtures.

12x24 slate, with 1x1 and 3x6 marble accent tiles
Andersen 200 series SDL double hung window (we got close to matching the existing window, but not perfect. The original had an overlay storm panel.)
LACAVA dual vanity. The plumbing was a bit of a PITA as it had to be run in the bridge of the vanity. It took some modifications to get the rough-in valve to fit.
Caesarstone counter and shower parts--curb, jambs, bench and alcove wrap.
Custom frameless shower door
Moen ShowHouse wall faucets
Dual Moen ShowHouse shower valves with handspray and ceiling rain head
Restoration Hardware sconces
Kohler in-wall mirrored medicine cabinets.

Shower alcove:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The demo of the bath on this project was the easiest I've ever encountered. All of the walls and ceilings were 3/8" plywood--even those with tile. They came off in nice big sheets with little dust and loose debris. That's the one good thing about shoddy work--it's easier to tear apart. :laughing:

Here are some shots during the roof work:



 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nice mix of old and new.

Are those quarts of motor oil in that shower shelf?:laughing:
Looks like it. :blink:

I wonder if 10w-30 makes a good conditioner... :laughing:
 

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wannabe
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Cool Vanity! Who gets the design credit?

great work as usual!
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
nice job, excellent pictures and finish. one question. Once you cut the roof at the gable end. How did you support the gable end roof overhang and barge board? I can't see any brackets under that wide eave.
The barge board is a 2x10. It's an imperfect detail, but typical for what I often find in the neighborhood. A lot of these overhangs are nothing but 3/4" t&g bead board that extends only to the next rafter back from the last common.

The overhang on the shed dormer was in much worse shape, and we tore it completely off and re-framed and boxed in in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Another beautiful bathroom, Chris! :thumbup:

Sorry if I missed it but is that a Toto or Kohler toilet?
It's a dual flush Toto, but the model name escapes me at the moment.
 

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Al Smith
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The barge board is a 2x10. It's an imperfect detail, but typical for what I often find in the neighborhood. A lot of these overhangs are nothing but 3/4" t&g bead board that extends only to the next rafter back from the last common.

The overhang on the shed dormer was in much worse shape, and we tore it completely off and re-framed and boxed in in.

That's why I asked. There's no more next rafter once you cut off the roof for the dormer at the gable wall. So its the ridge and facia that hold that 2 foot section of overhang?
 

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Carpe Diem
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It's a dual flush Toto, but the model name escapes me at the moment.
I think I have installed the same one before:




Did you have any issues with there being a little "rock" when installed?

I had to attach a plastic mount to the floor and the toilet slid on and attached via the 2 small visible screws to the plastic. However, there was some natural "give" to the plastic and there was no way to pull the toilet more towards the floor. The plastic mount was securely attached to the flat floor. Ultimately, I had to shim the toilet to remove the movement. I thought was a poor design, especially for a Toto.

I have another bathroom later in the year that will be using a Kohler that looks identical. It will be interesting to see if I have similar issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That's why I asked. There's no more next rafter once you cut off the roof for the dormer at the gable wall. So its the ridge and facia that hold that 2 foot section of overhang?
We left the last common and framed the outside wall of the bath inside of it. Yes, the OH is supported by the barge board--which is essentially a 2x10 fly rafter--tied to the ridge and the gutter board at the bottom.
 
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