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Builder/Remodeler
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finally got back to this remodel to photograph it. We completed the work about 6 months ago.

The master bath space was enlarged from its original footprint by moving the bedroom wall and removing a number of bulkheads. It features Ann Sacks glass mosaic wall tile paired with a multi-color slate. The slate was re-sawn to a smaller format for the shower floor. All of the cabinetry is custom made from cherry veneers and solids. The pocket doors are natural pine with white laminate glass, in cherry jambs and casings which are also custom made.

All of the dimensions of the shower--wing walls, alcoves, wall heights--were established based on the dimensions of the mosaic tile so that all outside intersections would be whole pieces.

Just about every custom element or gadget you can think of for a bath was used here:

Toto Washlet toilet and seat
Heated towel bar
Heated floor mat under slate
Lighted mirrors
Powered skylight
Custom vanities, medicine cabinets, and tall storage cabinet
Custom made pocket door slabs of pine and white laminate glass
Custom made cherry casing trim and pocket jambs with Hafele track hardware
2 Hansgrohe 3/4" thermostatic shower valves with various outputs
Custom cherry closet cabinetry
Fleurco Kinetic sliding glass shower enclosure

Before:


After:


Before:


After:
 

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Smart phone? Scan me!
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2,137 Posts
Haha.. love that last pic, couldn't get it in the room had to step outside for it! :thumbsup: I like the overall style.. modernish (fung shwai?) I grew up in a house built back in the 50's. It's exterior was green.. the interior colors were.. green. So any time I see green right now I am hesitant on it. I like the overall style and all.. but I am just not a huge fan of green.

You did an awesome job though man :) What stain is on all the wood? Teak?
 

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Builder/Remodeler
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Haha.. love that last pic, couldn't get it in the room had to step outside for it! :thumbsup: I like the overall style.. modernish (fung shwai?) I grew up in a house built back in the 50's. It's exterior was green.. the interior colors were.. green. So any time I see green right now I am hesitant on it. I like the overall style and all.. but I am just not a huge fan of green.

You did an awesome job though man :) What stain is on all the wood? Teak?
Thanks.

It's all cherry, clear coat only. The pocket doors are pine, with danish oil.
 

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Builder/Remodeler
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3,803 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Beautiful job Chris! Is that one of those toilet seats that washes and drys your privates? (Toto?) Can you order Chinese or surf the internet with those ?
Yes, you are correct.

I put plastic over the bowl and sat on it to test the remote. It is a marvel of modern technology. :laughing:

Heated seat with selectable temperature
Heated water spray with selectable temperature
Two different spray wands--with adjustable pulsing action
Heated air dry
 

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Service & Repairs
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4,001 Posts
Chris, I am totally serious when I say this, has your work ever been featured in magazines or something like that?

Your work, and design, are some of the best i've ever seen.
 

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Project Manager HFH..
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Nice!:thumbup:I strive to one day be that good.I know my limitations...
 

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Builder/Remodeler
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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Ditto.

Hey what is that... an iPod port on the wall beside the crapper?
One keypad is the remote for the skylight. The other is the remote for the Toto Washlet toilet seat.


Yes, it DOES do all that. Crazy. :laughing:


Chris, I am totally serious when I say this, has your work ever been featured in magazines or something like that?

Your work, and design, are some of the best i've ever seen.
Thank you very much for saying that. My work has appeared in local publications but I've not really pursued national press very much up to now. I've had a couple of small projects appear but I don't have copies of them. Design wise, I work with a few very talented architects and designers who bring me projects on a regular basis. I'm known for being a very designer friendly builder in that I stay out of their way while working hard for they and the HO to execute the design in the most efficient, aesthetically pleasing way possible. (I make them look good and I make their designs look good.) I'm notorious for tearing things out if I don't think they're perfect.

I've seen and heard of all lot of guys over the years who have a huge chip on their shoulder about working with an Architect or Designer. Sometimes the frustration is well founded, but often it's just ego. I set mine aside a long time ago. Those I work with regularly are more talented designers than I could ever hope to be. Working with them on so many projects has taught me a lot, but it's also showed me that I can achieve more working with them than I ever could trying to do it all myself. Of course, there has to be mutual respect there for the relationship to work--and I've parted ways with a few who didn't get that.

My guys and I are craftsmen, first and foremost. When a project appears in a magazine, it's usually credited to the designer. But I've been around the block enough times that the folks in my neck of the woods know who I am anyway--and I'd rather my designers catch the limelight while I get the first shot at doing their choicest projects down the road.

Sometimes it's hard not to feel slighted when you work so hard on something--but you have to keep your eye on the big picture. Many relationships have been soured over the years by a small thing like not giving credit to someone for a design. That's why all of the projects in my portfolio carry a designer credit.

Nice!:thumbup:I strive to one day be that good.I know my limitations...
It's the little things that make the biggest difference... When a project turns out amazing (in regards to its craftsmanship)--it's usually because all of the little details were paid attention to and cared for by everyone who touched it--from the first day of deconstruction to the last day of punch out.
 

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Project Manager
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Nice job, as always Chris. I can't imagine you ever get tired of hearing that.

Did you alter the roof line above the shower? Or is the one larger skylight and shower block glass window making me perceive things that aren't there?
 

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Builder/Remodeler
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Nice job, as always Chris. I can't imagine you ever get tired of hearing that.

Did you alter the roof line above the shower? Or is the one larger skylight and shower block glass window making me perceive things that aren't there?
Thanks Cooke.

If you look at the befores at the top of the page, you can see there were two skylights originally, which we replaced with one larger unit. There was an existing window which we removed and framed larger for the glass block.

The original ceiling was lower mostly because of bulkheads and dead attic space.
 

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Project Manager HFH..
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OK..That bidet/butt washer is just plain weired!What happend to good old TP?:laughing:
 

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Builder/Remodeler
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So you had extra room above the ceiling to create height without getting into restructuring the roof?
Right. The bedroom next door was vaulted with a very high ridge. The bath was dropped for the most part. We moved the partition wall to the bedroom to enlarge the bath, and took the ceiling higher.

What type of material is that for the integral shower shelves, top of shower curb and glass block window jambs?
The slab material is 2cm slate.
 
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