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I have a client that wants me to do a renovation on their home and one of the things that they want me to do is increase the height of their first floor ceiling. Apparently, they have heard of contractors jacking up the second floor, adding steel beams to reinforce everything, and then setting the second floor down on the beams. It is a 2 story colonial in New England. Has anyone ever heard of this technique? Cost?
 

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Commercial construction
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JDT1,
You have a PM. It contains the names of 4 contractors in your area that do this kind of work.

At the bottom of the first page of my web site are pictures of a similar type job. I've managed several of them. They're a blast.

What is the square footage of the house? How many chimneys/fireplaces are there? What kind of siding do you have? Any brick on the exterior walls?

I wish you were closer, I love doing these jobs.
 

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bumping a very old thread because i am looking for the same in long island, ny. steel height increase in the first floor. know anyone who can help me get this done for a client?
thanks
 

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I can't imagine how much that would cost. We have done some very expensive, extensive remodels over the last 30 years, and never had anyone suggest doing that.
 

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I can't imagine how much that would cost. We have done some very expensive, extensive remodels over the last 30 years, and never had anyone suggest doing that.
I'll get asked about this for old buildings with low ceiling height (maybe less than 7'). Sometimes you can just slide in steel and gain a couple inches to meet code. Raising the roof on a second floor is more common in this area, but still not common.
 

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way too expensive just for some more ceiling height. If I had a gun to my head and had to chit out a number it would be 150k. I know someone who owns a giant Greek revival farm house and they had the existing two story's lifted 15 feet to add a new first floor underneath ( 30+ years ago).
 

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The Ultimate Wire Hider
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Ted's $0.02:

It might be cheaper to raze the top half of the house and rebuild it.

The other option might be to lift a couple of floors on the second level that sit above the dining and living room areas. This is more attainable being that most of the electrical and plumbing lines are run between floor via the perimeter or the center of the house.
 

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Cheaper than tearing down a 3 story and building new...[/QUOTE
Yeah true.
yeah, that's pretty much it. basement finished. first floor low ceiling height for the local market. second floor can be lofted.

electrical and plumbing will all be redone so concern over cutting lines / tubes is less relevant. found a local contractor who specializes in lifting structures and it might be cheaper to lift the whole house and add a knee wall instead of lifting below the 2nd floor.

resale value is the concern at this point and research is being done on the ROI.
 

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For the Jersey shore area, the usual cost of the lift itself has been in the 14-18k range. That's just for the lift company to come out to jack and lower the house. The cost to put it all back together will vary wildly and depend on what the architect specs. We had one job where we ripped the second floor off and had to run 12" paralams around the entire perimeter. The plumber loved that one...

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

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Hi wasdifferent. This is following on from your post here some years ago about jacking up house to increase ceiling. I’m having the same issue. The house is in Greenwich Connecticut. Is that in your area? If not, do you have recommendations for the area? Thank you so much
 
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