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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys, I am currently bidding a commercial space where we will be hanging & finishing drywall, but before the drywall is hung, the job specs the framing to be covering in some type of sheeting, to protect any forced entry into the space by cutting the drywall (Art Gallery)

The Sheeting is costing a pretty penny and the tenant is advising if they are cheaper alternatives.

Any Suggestions?
 

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expanded metal?

There was a thread a while back about a bank I think....
 

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Guys, I am currently bidding a commercial space where we will be hanging & finishing drywall, but before the drywall is hung, the job specs the framing to be covering in some type of sheeting, to protect any forced entry into the space by cutting the drywall (Art Gallery)

The Sheeting is costing a pretty penny and the tenant is advising if they are cheaper alternatives.

Any Suggestions?[/quote


3/4 plywood?:thumbsup:
 

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Fourteen gauge sheet metal is going to be heavy, and costly. It will also play hell with running much of the HVAC, pipe, and electrical.

Expanded metal can be used, but is difficult because of its increased thickness. Flattened expanded metal is more expensive, but has a thinner and more uniform thickness. The best material of this sort is punched security screen. It looks like expanded metal, but because it is a punched material it is flat. But the punching process causes a huge amount of material loss, so it is by far the most expensive.

Plywood can effectively discourage thieves, but depending on codes, construction and occupancy, you may be required to build out of fire treated plywood.

Chicken wire is very cheap and is also effective, although to a much lesser degree. But it certainly stops most entry by hammer.

Most drywall manufacturers have other products which are proprietary, effective, and expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Plywood is out, it needs to be fire code . Expanded metal is actually pretty cheap, Around $40 per sheet for a 4x8 sheet. We advised about it, but wasn't interested. He now wants 10ga , which in my opinion is an over kill. The sucker weighs 225 lbs. per sheet. Is that even manageable with hands? Can self drilling screws pierce through or would it need to be pre-drilled?
 

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I've seen rebar run horizontally through the studs. Don't remember the spacing, but they would need to be close enough to keep someone from slipping through.
 

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Plywood is out, it needs to be fire code . Expanded metal is actually pretty cheap, Around $40 per sheet for a 4x8 sheet. We advised about it, but wasn't interested. He now wants 10ga , which in my opinion is an over kill. The sucker weighs 225 lbs. per sheet. Is that even manageable with hands? Can self drilling screws pierce through or would it need to be pre-drilled?

If the ply is covered with 5/8 rock, they won't accept??
We have done it in residences for mental patients with the desire to punch holes in walls, never a problem.:eek:
 

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The Sheeting is costing a pretty penny and the tenant is advising if they are cheaper alternatives.
Do your customers have any idea of what they want. This entire discussion started as cheaper alternatives to expanded metal, which has morphed into:

He now wants 10ga , which in my opinion is an over kill. The sucker weighs 225 lbs. per sheet
Actually probably closer to 175#/sheet, but regardless. The price of steel is probably between $.80/lb and $1.10 /lb (at least, it's been awhile since I bought steel). If $40 a sheet is too much, why does he now think $200 per sheet is OK?

On a different tact
Plywood is out, it needs to be fire code
If the ply is covered with 5/8 rock, they won't accept??
Framer, non-combustible construction is commonly required in commercial applications, depending on the construction type and occupancy of the building. What that means is that the walls must be constructed of non-combustible materials. This is why metal studs are so commonly used

Plazaman, can fire-treated plywood could be used? FT ply is almost always accepted for incorporation in non-combustible construction throughout the Puget Sound area. It's going to run $50 per sheet, but it seems as the owner doesn't care.

I think this owner is pulling your chain, and has no idea of what he wants, or how much he needs to spend.
 

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Framer, non-combustible construction is commonly required in commercial applications, depending on the construction type and occupancy of the building. What that means is that the walls must be constructed of non-combustible materials. This is why metal studs are so commonly used
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>


I understand that except that we are now allowed in commercial construction to use wood, as long as the building has sprinklers.:thumbsup:
 

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I was refering to the use of FT wood in non-combustible construction in Type I buildings, such as skyscrapers. What you are probably refering to is V-A construction with a sprinkler exception. I doubt you could use not treated wood construction of any sort in a 50 storey building, even in Utica:thumbsup:
 

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I was refering to the use of FT wood in non-combustible construction in Type I buildings, such as skyscrapers. What you are probably refering to is V-A construction with a sprinkler exception. I doubt you could use not treated wood construction of any sort in a 50 storey building, even in Utica:thumbsup:
I believe we are up to 4 stries now. 50 would be stretching it.

I took from the poster this was a matter of security, normally a concern on a first floor. :thumbsup:
 

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they make a flat wire mesh i don't no what they call its used it in prisons and detention centers . i have seemlier metal on my outdoor table. it looks like diamond pattern. screw over metal studs before you rock . you can also yous hard wear cloth comes in four foot buy 100 ft roils we put it over the metal studs like in target stock rooms so you can see in the room but it steel secure .cool dude in broken arrow
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ok Guys we finally came to an agreement. Its going to be 10ga Steel sheets.

Currently, Our wall is wood frame with 5/8th drywall on both sides. We will be working on 1 side, (interior) where we will predrill holes onto the steel sheet then secure to the existing wall with fastener and some construction adhesive. Then we will apply glue to the drywall and adhere to the steel and secure with a few fasteners.

Question:

1) How should be attach the steel to the existing wall? We are thinking of nailing the sheets onto the existing wall with roofing nails.
2) How can we attach the drywall to the steel panel? (other than what i mentioned above)

Thanks.

I mean, i know my plan of attach will work, just curious how you guys would do it different.


Dont ask how the walls were framed with wood to begin with!
 

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I know there's self drilling drywall wall screws that'll do 14ga. but I don't know about 10ga. I would say that 16 or 14 gage would be just as much of a deterrent than the 10 ga., which seems way overkill.
 

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Way overkill. 10ga is pretty much a structural size. The easiest way to cut it is with a torch, is that possible on your job? And you were planning on nailing it to the studs with roofing nails. I'm sorry, but that idea seems really bad.

I would think that it should be screwed to the studs with substantial screws. And quite a few of them.

You really need to get your customer back to earth
 
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