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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We're here fighting this stupid weather on our big ICF house, still trying to get our footings poured. They're all formed and covered with heat in there in an attempt to eliminate any lingering frost, and try to get through our next cold spell and snow that we having coming in this weekend. I hate trying to work on this phase of construction in the winter. My question though, for guys that are experienced ICF guys, is it a horrible idea to try and attempt to pour all of our basement walls, and the suspended garage floor in one pour? We've got 12' basement walls on a structure that is nearly 100' long and 60' wide, and the garage floor alone is nearly 1700 square feet. Our only reasoning to try to attempt this would be to eliminate the cold joint between the wall and the garage floor, and to save the cost of a pump truck to pour the floor. My biggest concern is keeping our walls level when we have the lite-deck forms sitting on them when we pour. Plus, it would be late in the day when we got the walls all poured and we started pouring the garage floor, so we'd be looking at who knows what time to start finishing the floor. What are your thoughts? I know there's some guys on here that do a lot of ICF, would you attempt it, or just do it in two pours? Especially in the winter time.
 

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I'm a Mac
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Winter or Summer you do this as a two pour job.

What's the concern with the cold joint? Add a water stop if your concerned about water intrusion, and use dowels at a minimum.

Your idea works but for the amount of additional prep work required to ensure no issues it's not worth it other then to prove you have the ability to do it, but those bragging rights are expensive to set up and if you do have a failure the repair is ridiculous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I agree. Personally, I'm with you guys. It needs to be two pours. Too many things involved with in floor heat in the garage, three floor drains, and part of the floor will be an outside patio, so the edges of it would need formed up as they'll continue out past the ICF wall. We'll be stick framing the exterior wall between the patio and garage after the floor is poured.
 

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I would do it as one, but as Chris pointed out, there is not a valid reason to do this, and unless you are really experienced, it should not be considered. I know it is tempting to run this as a one pour based on the pump cost, but you also have to keep in mind that you would be trying to finish concrete on top of walls that are not "set".

But, thinking about it.....I would do it in one if it was me...and I would start the walls early am with hot water in the mix, and then run the beam pockets in the LightDeck as I finalized the last wall lift. Slow and steady would work, but there would be no substitute for experience in how this would have to be braced, or handled.

I have a basement to do in a few weeks, and we will pour the floor of the basement with the walls, because I prefer shoring to be on a level surface, and, the finished floor will be above the footing perimeter drain by 8 inches or so.
 

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I would do it as one, but as Chris pointed out, there is not a valid reason to do this, and unless you are really experienced, it should not be considered. I know it is tempting to run this as a one pour based on the pump cost, but you also have to keep in mind that you would be trying to finish concrete on top of walls that are not "set".

But, thinking about it.....I would do it in one if it was me...and I would start the walls early am with hot water in the mix, and then run the beam pockets in the LightDeck as I finalized the last wall lift. Slow and steady would work, but there would be no substitute for experience in how this would have to be braced, or handled.

I have a basement to do in a few weeks, and we will pour the floor of the basement with the walls, because I prefer shoring to be on a level surface, and, the finished floor will be above the footing perimeter drain by 8 inches or so.
 
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