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chief pencil holder
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My third drug of choice.





A clear topcoat, harder that regular lacquer, I like CV better but a similar beast. Cat lacquer makes me sick, and no need for a sanding sealer with CV, and it sands do beautifully, that is why I use CV.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Most catalyzed lacquers are conversion varnishes. They are a two part system, the lacquer and the catalyst. A post cat conversion varnish is the standard of the industry for most cabinetry. It is a hard, durable and chemical resistant finish. It is slower to dry than a pre cat or nitrocellulose lacquer. But because there is a high catalyst ratio it will cure to about 85% within a 24 hour period. You must use it in a controlled environment. It needs to be greater than 65ºF to be used, otherwise it will fail to crosslink properly and you will get a much reduced durability.

What else you wanna know about it?
 

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chief pencil holder
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Most catalyzed lacquers are conversion varnishes. They are a two part system, the lacquer and the catalyst. A post cat conversion varnish is the standard of the industry for most cabinetry. It is a hard, durable and chemical resistant finish. It is slower to dry than a pre cat or nitrocellulose lacquer. But because there is a high catalyst ratio it will cure to about 85% within a 24 hour period. You must use it in a controlled environment. It needs to be greater than 65ºF to be used, otherwise it will fail to crosslink properly and you will get a much reduced durability.

What else you wanna know about it?
show off, :notworthy
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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Without getting all scientific and all, pre cat lacquer has a hardener added at the factory that does make it harden up more than regular furniture grade lacquer.

What most people want to know is the pros and cons compared to conversion varnish in the interests of the end user, not so much for the person applying it.

On the plus side is price. Cheaper by about 25%.

On the down side - It is not as moisture resistant as CV

Those are the two big ones. Pre cat lacquer will last a life time if taken care of properly. You just should not use water born products to clean it. Lemon oil based products are all you need.

Some people say that you can get a yellowing over time from the lacquer. I have not had that problem, I don't think.

Thats it in a nutshell
 
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The Remodeler
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I havent yet used anything labeled Conversion Varnish.... I generally stick with pre-cats... They are a pain in the ass to sand.... I made the mistake of skipping the sanding sealer once... never again. Can you get a good finish with CV using crappy spray equipment, and is the little bit that makes it through the respirator going to kill me?

For Wallmaxx- Catalyzed Lacquer is a solvent based finish that has crosslinking properties to form a more durable surface. Drop some lacquer thinner on regular Nitro Lacquer even 10 years after it's applied, and you'll ruin the finish.. Drop some thinner of the pre-cats after a week, and you'll be okay.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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show off, :notworthy
I agree with Gus and I usually use a Pre cat lacquer (ML Campbell MagnaMax). It is much easier to use, cheaper and the best thing is you can pour it back into the can. With a post cat if you don't use it, you throw it out. So you are making smaller batches and trying to be very accurate and mix up only what you need. With a pre cat I usually mix up 80 oz and stick it in the Kremlin. If I don't use it all I pour it back into the can.

I use the CV for wood countertops and for painted projects because it is water white and doesn't yellow.

Gus, the MagnaMax does yellow after a period of time. I tried it on some cabinets in my bath and a mirror frame. The cabinets got a clear coat over the post cat pigmented lacquer. The mirror frame was just pigmented lacquer with no clear coat. You can see the difference after 2 years. If I didn't have the comparison I would never know.

ML Campbell now has a pre cat conversion varnish (MagnaKlear). I figured the specs would be much better than the MagnaMax, but it is less or equal on most things. Only advantage I can see is it is truly water white and has a UV inhibitor in it. I haven't used it but plan to. I hope it sands better than MagnaMax, if it does I will probably switch over. If not, I won't.
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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Maclac seems to be the most common brand around here.

Check out the 201 series and educate me as to any difference there may be to your brand of choice.

http://www.maclac.com/Material Safety Data Sheet.htm

I think we are ready for another hit from the air qualy control board to remove some more solvents from the evil witches brew too.
 
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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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What the heck is satin flat? Is that a 25 sheen? My flat is 15 and my satin is 35
 

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I use MagnaMax as well.. Havent heard of MagnaKlear yet, but then again, my Campbell rep is an idiot... :censored:
I would rate my rep as excellent. The mobile rep is full of knowledge but hard to get a hold of.

MagnaKlear just came out about 1 year ago on a trial basis in a few states, not mine. I have been trying to get them to bring a few gallons in to the supply house but if I want it I am going to have to order it and have it shipped to them (from Albany, NY). I've already told them, just order it and I will try at least one gallon. If I like it I am not going to want to wait a few days for it to come in. I just want to go over there and grab it.

It is suppose to be water white, they claim MagnaMax is, but it isn't. But that is one of the things I like about it. It has the amber effect of the old world solvents. But it also yellows over time so it has pluses and minuses. The MagnaKlear isn't suppose to yellow over time and has an UV inhibitor in it. I wasn't impressed with the look of natural cherry, water white imparts no life to the cherry. My rep tried to tell me that it would stop the cherry from changing color due to light and age. I disagreed with him. I basically told him there is nothing that is going to stop cherry from changing. It might slow it down some, but stop it, hardly. I couldn't believe he wasn't going to give up on it. The only way you are going to stop cherry from changing is put it in a vacuum and never let is see light. Now won't that look beautiful :w00t:
 
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